What’s in Your RV Emergency Kit?

Preparing for an emergency is something all RVers need to think about.

We all know about car emergency kits. But an RV is much different than a car. A car, for instance, doesn’t travel with a tank of fresh water. And a car is also less likely to find itself stranded at an alpine lake due to a freak snow storm. Most people also wouldn’t drive their car 30 miles into BLM-managed public lands with the intention of living out of it for a week or more.

Poche's Fish-N-Camp RV Park, Breaux Bridge, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Poche’s Fish-N-Camp RV Park, Breaux Bridge, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

When considering your RV emergency kit, keep in mind the kinds of emergency situations you might face during your RV travels.

In previous articles on Vogel Talks RVing, we’ve discussed safety tips and useful items and accessories to travel with on RV road trips.

Today’s post details safety items and accessories to pack in your recreational vehicle’s first aid kit and tool box.

RV First Aid Kit

A first aid kit readily available in an emergency isn’t just a good idea—it’s a necessity for every RVer. A well-stocked first-aid kit and manual can help you respond effectively to common injuries and emergencies. You can purchase first aid kits and refills at the Red Cross store, most drugstores, or assemble your own.

Wolfsboro, New Hampshire © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Wolfsboro, New Hampshire © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Contents of a first-aid kit should include adhesive tape, antibiotic ointment, antiseptic solution or towelettes, bandages, calamine lotion, cotton balls and cotton-tipped swabs, gauze pads and roller gauze in assorted sizes, first aid manual, petroleum jelly or other lubricant, safety pins in assorted sizes, scissors and tweezers, and sterile eyewash.

Familiarize yourself with the items in the first aid kit and know how to properly use them. Check your first-aid kits regularly, at least every three months, to replace supplies that have expired.

The Mayo Clinic is an excellent source for first aid information to help you during a medical emergency.

Somewhere in the Davis Mountains in West Texas. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Somewhere in the Davis Mountains in West Texas. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

If you travel with pets, pet first aid manuals are also available.

RV Tool Box

Just about anything in your RV that can snap, crack, rip loose, tear, bend, leak, spark, or fall off will do exactly that at the most inconvenient time. Something will need to be tightened, loosened, pounded flat, pried, or cut.

To help you deal with everyday problems and annoyances, maintain a well-equipped tool box in the RV (always store on curb side).

Contents should include Phillips and Robertson head and flat bladed screwdrivers (large, medium, small), standard and needle-nose pliers, channel-lock pliers (medium and large), 10-inch Crescent wrench, claw hammer, hobby knife with blade protector, wire cutters, tape measure, silicone sealant, Gorilla tape and glue, electrical tape, battery jumper cables, open and box-end wrenches, silicone spray, WD-40 lubricant, bungee cords, road flares/warning reflectors, fold-down shovel, stepladder, spare fuses, and heavy-duty tire pressure gauge.

Mokee Dugway in Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Mokee Dugway in Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Many RVers also carry a socket wrench set (standard and metric), small drill bit set and cordless drill with spare battery, and digital voltmeter.

Gorilla Tape is a brand of adhesive tape sold by the makers of Gorilla Glue, and available in several sizes and colors, including camouflage, white, and clear.

New River Gorge National River in West Virginia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

New River Gorge National River in West Virginia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Gorilla Tape can solve many problems while on the road—and you can do most anything with this stuff. RVers have used it to temporarily repair a sewer hose, keep a driver’s side window from continually falling, and even affix the coffee maker to the counter so that it doesn’t move during travel.

Other Considerations

Other considerations, supplies, and equipment include fire extinguishers (one in the galley, one in the bedroom, and one outside of the RV in a basement compartment, plus one in the toad/tow vehicle), NOAA weather radio, LED flashlights, heavy-duty whistles, emergency waterproof matches, jumper cables, ice/snow window scrapers, work gloves, and blue tarp.

Shenandoah Valley in Virginia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved.

Shenandoah Valley in Virginia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Worth Pondering…

Remember, safety is no accident.

Leave a Reply