Breaux Bridge: Cajun Crawfish Country

The origins of this charming town date back to 1771, when Firmin Breaux purchased the land and later built a footbridge across the Bayou Teche. Travelers were often given directions to “go to Breaux’s bridge.”

Officially founded in 1829, Breaux Bridge is today best known for its Cajun culture and crawfish cuisine. In fact, it was here that the delicious dish crawfish étouffée was first created.

Nestled along the banks of the slow-rolling Bayou Teche, Breaux Bridge, the “Crawfish Capital of the World,” is a gorgeous historic town. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Nestled along the banks of the slow-rolling Bayou Teche, Breaux Bridge, the “Crawfish Capital of the World,” is a gorgeous historic town. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The city known as the “Crawfish Capital of the World” pays tribute to this freshwater crustacean with the annual Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival the first weekend in May (May 5-7, in 2018).

At the Crawfish Fest, you’ll find them prepared just about every way possible—boiled crawfish, crawfish bisque, crawfish pie, crawfish étouffée, and fried crawfish, to name a few. You’ll also find an array of other Louisiana favorites.

Visitors will find a charming downtown with shopping and delicious restaurants, such as Café Des Amis (140 East Bridge Street), which hosts its famous zydeco brunch on Saturdays.

Visitors will find a charming downtown with shopping and delicious restaurants, such as Café Des Amis (140 East Bridge Street), which hosts its famous zydeco brunch on Saturdays. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Visitors will find a charming downtown with shopping and delicious restaurants, such as Café Des Amis (140 East Bridge Street), which hosts its famous zydeco brunch on Saturdays. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Breaux Bridge is the proud home of one of the last remaining traditional Cajun dancehalls: La Poussiere (1301 Grand Point Avenue). With a gorgeous wooden dance floor waxed to a reflective finish and a steadfast crowd of locals who’ll show you how the waltz and two-step are properly done, it’s a stop that’s off the typical tourist path, but one worth making.

For elegant interpretations of Cajun classics, like gumbo and crawfish etouffee, the aforementioned Cafe des Amis is the place to go. It’s not the cheapest menu in town, but the food is beautifully prepared and the service is impeccable. Save room for the white chocolate bread pudding dessert; it’s outstanding.

Breaux Bridge and Crawfish have become symbolic in their relationship. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Breaux Bridge and Crawfish have become symbolic in their relationship. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

For lunch, one great option is the traditional Cajun fare served up at Poche’s Market (3015 Main Highway A. Go simple with a sack of cracklins (fresh-fried pork rinds) and a couple of links of boudin (a sausage stuffed with pork and white rice), or choose a plate lunch from the day’s specials, which often feature mains like smothered pork chops, backbone stew, or crawfish fettuccine, and sides like black eyed peas, smothered potatoes with tasso ham, yams, or green beans.

For a Creole and Soul Food take on the plate lunch, visit Glenda’s Creole Kitchen (3232 Main Highway 31). For under $10, you can get a heaping plate of stuffed turkey wings, smothered okra with chicken and sausage, catfish courtbouillon, Creole meatloaf with mashed potatoes, and other rich, spicy, comforting foods. Anthony Bourdain lunched here on his show No Reservations, which put it (deservedly) on the map.

New in 2009 with paved streets, Cajun Palms offers long pull-through sites that range in length from 55 to 75 feet. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

New in 2009 with paved streets, Cajun Palms offers long pull-through sites that range in length from 55 to 75 feet. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If it’s big ol’ heaps of fried or boiled seafood that you seek, Crazy ‘Bout Crawfish (1905 Rees Street) is the place to get it. It’s an over-the-top sort of place that’s dripping with folk art and silly crawfish-themed artifacts—a little bit tacky, but very fun. Service is friendly, the food is fantastic, and prices are excellent.

Where to Stay

Cajun Palms RV Resort, Henderson

New in 2009 with paved streets, Cajun Palms offers long pull-through sites that range in length from 55 to 75 feet. Not to be ignored are the back-ins to the lake in the 55-60 foot range. Pull through and back-in sites have 20 feet of space between each concrete pad.

Poche's RV Park has highly rated facilities, 88 pull-through sites equipped with 30/50-amp electric service, sewer, and water. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Poche’s RV Park has highly rated facilities, 88 pull-through sites equipped with 30/50-amp electric service, sewer, and water. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A full service resort, Cajun Palms features numerous traditional as well as high tech amenities.

Accommodations consist of over 300 deluxe RV sites and 25 cabins. RV sites have full hookups, 30/50-amp, 70+ channels of digital cable, and on-site water and sewer. Easy-on, easy off Interstate 10 (Exit 115) at Henderson (near Breaux Bridge).

Poche’s RV Park: Breaux Bridge 

The appeal is in all the name, fish, and camp in the heart of Louisiana.

Poche’s RV Park has highly rated facilities, 88 pull-through sites equipped with 30/50-amp electric service, sewer, and water. The park also features a clubhouse, showers, laundry, dog walk, playground and more.

Poche's RV Park has highly rated facilities, 88 pull-through sites equipped with 30/50-amp electric service, sewer, and water. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Poche’s RV Park has highly rated facilities, 88 pull-through sites equipped with 30/50-amp electric service, sewer, and water. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

You’re guaranteed the reel the big one at Poche’s, the park boasts fifty acres of well-maintained ponds stocked with largemouth bass, bream, and catfish. No license is required and you can keep the fish you catch for a delicious fish fry.

The aforementioned Poche’s Market is located 2.8 miles south of the RV park.

Worth Pondering…

Jambalaya

Goodbye joe, me gotta go, me oh my oh
Me gotta go pole the pirogue down the bayou
My yvonne, the sweetest one, me oh my oh
Son of a gun, well have good fun on the bayou
—Hank Williams, Sr.

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