Raise Your RV IQ With These Tips

Your recreational vehicle is a vacation home wherever you want it, whenever you want it. It’s freedom and security in equal measure. It’s Lewis and Clark on turbo-charge.

Whether you just bought your first RV or you have owned one for a while, nothing beats the ease and freedom of walking into your unit and hitting the open road.

Before setting out on your next adventure, consider the following five tips to raise your RV IQ.

Safe travels and keep your wheels on the road. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Safe travels and keep your wheels on the road. Pictured above Lost Dutchman State Park, Arizona. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Travel With Propane Off

This is a common topic discussed around the campfire, and it is a bit controversial. The best I can do is to offer my personal opinion. It really is safer to drive with the propane supply turned off at the tank.

I believe that having the propane on while traveling increases the risk of a fire if you are involved in an accident. If a gas line is damaged or broken, and the propane tank supply valves are open, there will be a release of potentially explosive propane gas. That’s a bad thing. For this reason, I choose to run with the main tank valve off.

Now, many folks will say: Hey, I’ve been running with the propane on for XX years, and nothing bad has ever happened to me. That may be true, but having the tank valves open increases your risk—it just does.

Many RVers want the propane on in order to run their fridges while traveling. Most folks find that, for the average trip, the refrigerator will maintain a low enough internal temperature to keep your food fresh. It is also possible to freeze some blue ice packs the night before and use them in the refrigerator compartment to help keep everything cold while traveling.

Travel safely…and stay away from road-gaiters and orange barrels. Pictured above JGW RV Park, Redding, California. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Travel safely…and stay away from road-gaiters and orange barrels. Pictured above JGW RV Park, Redding, California. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Extension Cords

If you use an extension cord to plug in your RV to the shoreline power, it’s essential that you utilize the right one. We’ve seen it happen far too many times: an RV owner uses a standard orange extension cord with a 15 amp rating to run their 30 amp power center. This is asking for trouble as the excessive power draw can overheat the cord and connection which can melt the cord and possibly cause a fire.

Give Me Forty Acres

When I’m hooked up to drive down the road, my setup is 58 feet long. That’s 38 feet of rig, almost 15 feet of Chevrolet Equinox, and a few feet of tow bar.

As most of you know, when towing a car with an RV, you should not back up. Some tow systems allow it for very short distances, but most advise never to do it; depending on the manufacturer, you will void your warranty.

It’s not an equipment or skills issue; it’s a physics issue. If you have experience backing trailers, you know that trailers move opposite to the rear of your tow vehicle; you can end up in a jackknife situation very quickly when in reverse. But, here’s the critical difference between a trailer and a toad: a toad has a steering wheel, and the toad’s tires can turn in all directions! You simply cannot back a toad the same way as a trailer. It will end up turning “Every Which Way But Loose,” as Eddie Rabbitt sang for that Clint Eastwood movie.

Since you can’t back up, it’s important to know your turn radius. You may wish to practice doing circles in a parking lot.

Safe travels and keep your wheels on the road. Pictured above Lake Mead RV Village, Nevada. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Safe travels and keep your wheels on the road. Pictured above Lake Mead RV Village, Nevada. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Install a Clear Sewer Hose Elbow

No one really wants to see what is going on inside the sewer hose. They make those things brown or black for a reason. But the truth is that by installing a clear elbow at the end you can prevent a lot of potential problems down the road. Seeing what is going on in your hose allows you to check for undissolved toilet paper (in which case you might want to switch brands), to know ahead of time if a clog is about to happen, and to have visual confirmation that the tank is done emptying.

Also, when you’re performing a black water flush you can easily see the color of the water, and when it runs clear be confident that the tank is clean.

Move Over Law

See ya down the road and safe traveling! Pictured above New Green Acres RV Park, Walterboro, South Carolina. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

See ya down the road and safe traveling! Pictured above New Green Acres RV Park, Walterboro, South Carolina. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Always be aware of emergency responders, including tow providers, when they are on the side of road assisting motorists.  More than 150 U.S. law enforcement officers have been killed since 1999 after being struck by vehicles along America’s highways. Each year tow company drivers are also struck and killed on the side of the road. Let’s do our part and be sure to change lanes. And remember, it is the law.

Worth Pondering…

Remember, safety is no accident.

Leave a Reply