5 More Amazing National Parks to Visit This Spring

Now is the time for people to emerge from their winter hibernation and discover new places and adventures. Some parks reach their peak this season—when crowds are just right, wildflowers are blooming, and wildlife is moving. All of these are ideal conditions to enjoy the great outdoors.

In an earlier post, we detailed five amazing national parks to visit in spring. Following are five more can’t-miss national parks for your RV travels this spring.

Death Valley National Park, California

Dante’s View, a 5,450-foot overlook near the edge of the Black Mountains on the eastern border of Death Valley, affords the best overall views of the southern half of the national park including Badwater. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Dante’s View, a 5,450-foot overlook near the edge of the Black Mountains on the eastern border of Death Valley, affords the best overall views of the southern half of the national park including Badwater. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Death Valley National Park sits in a low depression east of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Though Death Valley measures just 12 miles wide, the expanse covers 130 miles in length.

Telescope Peak marks the highest elevation in the park at 11,039 feet, while the lowest spot, Badwater, is down at 282 feet below sea level, the fifth lowest point in the world.

You obviously don’t want to go to the hottest place on the planet in the summer, when temperatures can easily reach 120 degrees. The spring is the best time to visit Death Valley Park because it’s comfortably warm. You can enjoy the beautiful borders and out-of-this-world sand dunes and peaks without having to worry about heat stroke. Visit in the spring to see some amazing wildflowers bloom.

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

From the breathtaking views along the Skyline Drive to the thrill of hiking to a mountain summit, it’s hard to leave Shenandoah without being inspired. Whether you’re looking to get in touch with nature, discover a piece of history, or simply relax in a serene environment, Shenandoah offers activities for visitors of all interests.

A mere 75 miles from the epicenter of Washington D.C., Shenandoah National Park offers visitors 200,000 acres of pristine mountains, waterfalls, and wildlife. Visit in the spring to catch the waterfalls at their most powerful and hike a section of the Appalachian Trail in comfortable 50 to 60-degree weather.

Arches National Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Arches National Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Arches National Park, Utah

Arches National Park is a geological wonderland. The extraordinary features of the park create a landscape of contrasting colors, landforms, and textures unlike any other in the world. The greatest density of natural arches in the world occurs in Arches which preserves more than 2,000 imposing natural sandstone arches.

Visitors love the 3-mile round-trip trek to Delicate Arch and the Fiery Furnace Walks which are a real gem.

Congaree National Park, South Carolina

Congaree National Park, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Congaree National Park, South Carolina © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Motorized transport is prohibited in the Congaree wilderness, which is known for its giant hardwoods and towering pines. You have to travel into the swamplands by foot or canoe, which only makes the experience more exciting. But this isn’t suitable for everyone which is perhaps why the park has fewer visitors than others. Waters from the Congaree and Wateree Rivers sweep through a floodplain, creating wetlands, oxbow lakes, and sloughs. The 22,200-acre park protects the largest contiguous tract of old-growth bottomland hardwood forest remaining in the U.S.

Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Petrified Forest National Park preserves one of the world’s largest and most vibrantly colored assemblies of petrified wood, historic structures, and archeological sites. The park is composed of two sections: the north section is a colorful badlands called the Painted Desert along with archaeological sites, and the southern section contains most of the petrified wood.

A 28-mile road encircling the park offers numerous overlooks and winds through the mesas and wilderness. Visitors can also choose to hike a variety of trails ranging from easy to difficult.

The land below is awash in burnt sienna, deep maroon, dusty purple, and sprinkled here and there with green plants.

 Worth Pondering…

Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.

—Rachel Carson

Leave a Reply