Can’t Get Meaux Cajun than Dat

Our RV travels have taken us through southwestern Louisiana on numerous occasions as we drove I-10 from Florida to Texas. This past winter we decided to check out Acadiana for ourselves and it did not disappoint.

Cajun Palms RV Resort consist of over 300 Deluxe RV Spots,12 Chalets,and 25 Cabins. RV spots have full hookups, 30- and 50-amp, 70+ channels of digital cable, and on-site water and sewer. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Cajun Palms RV Resort consist of over 300 Deluxe RV Spots,12 Chalets,and 25 Cabins. RV spots have full hookups, 30- and 50-amp, 70+ channels of digital cable, and on-site water and sewer. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

During a three-week period we used three RV Parks as our home base: Cajun Palms RV Resort in Breaux Bridge, Frog City RV Park in Duson, and A+ Motel & RV Park in Sulphur.

Adventures in culture, food, and music await in Cajun Country where life is on the spicy side.

With quintessential Louisiana flavors such as boudin, crackling, crawfish, gumbo, jambalaya, and hot sauce, Acadiana has all the makings for a taste-tempting trip.

Louisiana’s landscape and history create a culinary tradition unlike any place else—and that makes it the perfect RV getaway for anyone who loves to eat.

But there is more to the Cajun appeal than just the food.

Between bites of their tasty cuisine, boredom is never a problem in Cajun Country.

First-time travelers rarely allow enough time to take in the region’s numerous treasures.

Visitors can experience Cajun food, music, history, and culture in cities like Lafayette, Lake Charles, and Houma; in smaller towns like Breaux Bridge, New Iberia, Crowley, and Opelousas.

Popular activities include dancing to Cajun and zydeco music, living history tours at Cajun historical villages, and air boat rides.

Nature experiences are abundant on the Creole Nature Trail, an All-American Road.

Turn-of-the-century rice mills gave Crowley its identity and made possible today's impressive collection of historic structures. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Turn-of-the-century rice mills gave Crowley its identity and made possible today’s impressive collection of historic structures. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Crowley: Where Life Is Rice and Easy

Rice is the bedrock of the region’s celebrated Cajun cuisine and no other Louisiana community is as intimately tied to the crop as Crowley, the Rice Capital of America. The swallow ponds and level prairies surrounding the city produce lots of crawfish too, but it was the turn-of-the-century rice mills that gave Crowley its identity and made possible today’s impressive collection of historic structures.

Many historic buildings still play prominent roles in the city’s life. One such example is Miller Stadium, a 1940s-era ballpark and the Grand Opera House of the South that first opened in 1901 and was recently revived as an elegant space for world-class performers.

Built in 1920 at a cost of $40,000, the former Crowley Motor Company has been revived as the new Crowley City Hall and Rice Interpretative Center. The second floor features the restored J.D. Miller Recording Studio—a place where legends performed.

Rayne

Things are really hopping in Rayne, the Frog Capital of the World and the Louisiana City of Murals.

Rayne and frogs go way back, too. In the 1900s, three Parisians—Jacques Weil and his brothers operated a profitable export business shipping a local delicacy—frog legs.

Colorful concrete frog statues have joined Rayne’s many frog murals as another attraction for visitors. The concrete figures painted by local artists were erected on a foot high granite pads at varying locations about the city.

Rayne will always be unique. St. Joseph Cemetery is listed in Ripley’s Believe it or Not! as the only cemetery in the United States facing north-south.

Breaux Bridge

The origins of this charming town span back to 1771, when Firmin Breaux purchased the land and later built a footbridge across the Bayou Teche. Travelers were often given directions to “go to Breaux’s bridge.”

Officially founded in 1829, Breaux Bridge is today best known for its Cajun culture and crawfish cuisine. In fact, it was here that the delicious dish crawfish étouffée was created.

St. Martinville

Bayou Teche, a waterway in south central Louisiana, meanders through St. Martinville, where birds wade among cattails, streets are shaded by century-old mossy oaks, and people enjoy fishing, picnics in the parks, and visits to historic museums.

Evangeline Oak Park on the Bayou Teche is one of most visited spot in St. Martinville. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Evangeline Oak Park on the Bayou Teche is one of most visited spot in St. Martinville. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The St. Martinville people are descendants of Beausoleil Broussard, an Acadian hero from the 1700s, and Bienvenu and the Duchamp families of French royalty, who fled revolution.

Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Site

Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Site explores the cultural interplay among the diverse peoples along the famed Bayou Teche. Acadians and Creoles, Indians and Africans, Frenchmen and Spaniards, slaves and free people of color all contributed to the historical tradition of cultural diversity in the Teche region.

The site is located on LA 31 in St. Martinville, 30 minutes southeast of Lafayette.

Please Note: This is Part 5 of an on-going series on Louisiana Cuisine/Travel Ideas

Worth Pondering…

Jambalaya

Goodbye joe, me gotta go, me oh my oh
Me gotta go pole the pirogue down the bayou
My yvonne, the sweetest one, me oh my oh
Son of a gun, well have good fun on the bayou
—Hank Williams, Sr.

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