Xantrex Introduces 24-volt Freedom SW Inverters/chargers

Originally launched 16 years ago in 12-volt configuration, and then re-engineered in early 2010 with pure sine wave technology, the best-selling Xantrex Freedom SW series of inverters/chargers continues to thrive and evolve enjoying strong consumer demand in both recreational and commercial markets.

Xantrex launches new 24-volt Freedom SW series inverterschargersThe all-new 24-volt models represent a logical line extension, embodying all of the premium qualities that built the Freedom name, according to a company news release.

“The new 24V models deliver a great mix of clean AC power, rapid charging performance, a wealth of features — all at a very enticing price,” said John McMillan, director of sales for the Xantrex brand at Schneider Electric.

“The demand for these new products is very high with a plethora of orders already in our system. We are an engineering company at heart. The rapid evolution of the Freedom SW is a testament to our passion of refining and developing new products and technologies.”

Designed for use in large boats, RVs, buses, commercial trucks, and other heavy-duty applications, the new Freedom SW 24V is ideal for powering a demanding mix of AC loads and charging large 24-volt battery banks.

The Freedom SW 24V, available in 2,000-watt/50-amp and 3,000-watt/75-amp models, incorporate pure sine wave performance and advanced features including parallel and series stacking and generator support mode.

Parallel stacking allows for system expansion by enabling two units to work in synergy to provide up to twice the rated current and charging output.

Series stacking enables operation of 240-volt AC applications, such as a dryer, water pump, or welder.

Generator support mode enables the Freedom SW to automatically supplement a generator when AC loads exceed the generator’s capacity.

This illustration depicts a sample electrical system for a Class ‘A’ motorhome where part of the electrical system is powered by a Xantrex inverter/charger.
This illustration depicts a sample electrical system for a Class ‘A’ motorhome where part of the electrical system is powered by a Xantrex inverter/charger.

In addition, a myriad of built-in features enable users to customize the performance to suit their specific needs.

The Freedom SW offers full output at higher temperatures and features efficient, power factor corrected charging.

Just like its 12-volt counterparts, the 24-volt models have been thoroughly tested in Xantrex’s internal highly accelerated life testing (HALT) chamber under extreme conditions to ensure the highest degree of reliability, and are specified to meet CSA, UL 458 with marine supplement, FCC Class B and ABYC requirements.

Both models are in stock and available to aftermarket and OEM partners.

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Xantrex Technology 

Xantrex Technology is a world leader in the development, manufacturing, and marketing of advanced power electronic products and systems for the mobile power markets.

The company’s products convert and control raw electrical power from any central, distributed, renewable, or backup power source into high-quality power required by electronic equipment and the electricity grid.

Xantrex provides mobile power solutions for all types and classes of both motorized and towable recreational vehicles. Xantrex products provide clean, quiet AC power so you don’t have to constantly rely on shore power or a noisy generator to enjoy the comforts of home in your RV.

banner-internal_rvAddress: 3700 Gilmore Way, Burnaby, BC V5G 4M1

Phone: (800) 670-0707

US Address: 541 Roske Drive, Suite A, Elkhart, Indiana 46516

Phone: (800) 446-6180

Website: xantrex.com

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One…
One tree can start a forest,
One smile can begin a friendship,
One hand can lift a soul,
One word can frame the goal,
One candle can wipe out darkness,
One laugh can conquer gloom,
One hope can raise our spirits,
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What is AGS and Why You Want One?

Imagine a world where you program your electrical system to automatically use the sources necessary to maintain it, while staying as energy efficient as possible.

Sound like something out of science fiction? GREAT NEWS: The future is NOW!

With the right components—including an AGS—this automated world and all of its exciting benefits—is here and available now!

So, what is an “AGS” and why do you want one?

If you’re a power junkie or a generator enthusiast, you may be familiar with AGS.

If not, there’s no time like the present to learn and put this highly efficient technology to work, to your full advantage.

AGS is the acronym for Automatic Generator Start. It is one of the least understood, but one of the most versatile and powerful, accessories available on the market today, according to a Xantrex news release.

At its basic function, AGS automatically starts and stops the generator using pre-defined parameters, thus relieving the user from having to actively manage his electrical system.

Most AGS modules start the generator when the batteries are low, and automatically shut it off when the batteries are recharged. Some models can even start and stop the generator based on the climate control system, or even the inverter load.

In the beginning, AGS was primarily developed for usage in the RV and marine markets, allowing enthusiasts to leave their cabin or boat for a day on the town, without having to burn excessive fuel via their generators to keep things comfortable. As the concept developed, early adopters responded favorably.

One of the first consumer demands was for air conditioner triggers, so beloved pets could be kept safe and cool while their owners were out and about. Inverter load triggering was an obvious addition when networked power systems were developed, thus allowing the AGS to launch the generator when a long-term heavy load was in place, thereby preventing an overload.

Xantrex AutoGen Start

While the concept itself sounds simple enough, is AGS difficult to program and use?

The only challenge with AGS may be experienced at the very outset. Some select models may have more sophisticated parameters to initiate, but with some help from a knowledgeable sales person or installer, that is easily overcome. Other models are more simple and easy to activate.

The good news: once AGS is set up and operational, it’s an easy “set it and forget it” device. Truly, once the parameters are set, the only choice left is whether you want to engage the AUTO mode, or OFF mode (some AGSs have a Manual ON mode as well, replacing the stand-alone generator control panel).

Here’s a simple explanation of the typical modes:

‘Off’ simply means that the AGS module is not active in monitoring triggers and the generator may still be started manually. However, if the generator is running when Off is set, the AGS will shut the generator down, even if it was set for Manual On or Auto.

‘Auto’ means that the AGS will begin monitoring the triggers that would cause an automatic start of the generator. It will start or stop the generator, based on those triggers.

‘Manual On’ will cause the AGS to start the generator without a required “trigger” and wait for the user to set the AGS to “Off” before shutting the generator down.

Wiring is fairly simple as the connections are usually:

DC voltage (some systems get power and DC voltage measurements from the inverter)

Air Conditioner (these are 12-volt or ground sense wires to determine the thermostat state)

Manual inputs (to add your own buttons somewhere to manually start the generator)

Generator interface (two to six wires for preheating, starting, and stopping the generator)

Xantrex AutoGen Start

Once these connections are made and the parameters are set, the AGS simply works to simulate the regular manual switches by closing/opening relays in the proper timing, based on the generator model.

In other words, when the system receives a trigger (low DC voltage, thermostat input, or inverter load), the AGS simply closes a relay, or series of relays, thus simulating the user pushing the start button. If preheat is required, it will push the proper sequence to preheat, then start the generator. When the trigger is no longer active, or has been satisfied, the AGS closes another relay that simulates the user pushing the stop button. Some AGSs have a minimum runtime to prevent premature wear on the generator’s engine.

If you might benefit from AGS in your personal application, make sure that the model of choice offers only those features you really want and need; take care not to get overwhelmed by a model with more features than are necessary for your usage.

There are models that have over 20 wire connections, but for a minimal installation, you may only need three! The rest of the wires are for different generator models, or optional features that you may not want to incorporate right away.

Also consider the difference between stand-alone AGS systems, which simply work with the hard-wired inputs they have, vs. networked AGS systems which can take data and generator start triggers from other devices like inverters and energy management systems. Some of the networked systems can also help the other devices make decisions like shedding loads, or supporting heavy generator loads, based on data shared between all devices.

When you’re ready to move up to today’s latest technology and enjoy the benefits of an easier and more efficient system, AGS delivers!

Details

Xantrex Technology Inc.

Xantrex Technology Inc. is a world leader in the development, manufacturing, and marketing of advanced power electronic products and systems for the mobile power markets. The company’s products convert and control raw electrical power from any central, distributed, renewable, or backup power source into high-quality power required by electronic equipment and the electricity grid.

Phone: (800) 446-6180 (toll free)

Website: xantrex.com

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