More Americans To Take Summer Road Trip

Memorial Day is the unofficial start of summer and kicks off summer vacation planning season. More Americans will take to the roads this year as they benefit from the low fuel prices.

travelocity-road-trip-infographicAccording to a recent Travelocity survey of 1000 Americans, 65 percent of those polled stated that they were more likely to take a road trip this summer compared to last summer.

While it’s clear that low fuel prices are likely driving Americans to take more road trips, Travelocity’s survey also looked at why road trips are still popular when it comes to travel.

While the majority of those surveyed replied that the destination is what they most look forward to, a full one-third of those polled felt that the best part of a road trip is the journey itself.

This sentiment was echoed by a number of Travelocity customers who were asked what they loved most about going on road trips. According to one veteran Travelocity customer, sharing and enjoying their favorite music on the road by “making road trip mixes” is the best part of a road trip, while another noted that it is “…fun to pull over to random roadside attractions. Those usually create long lasting memories and stories that will forever commemorate the trip.”

When asked about what person with whom they would least want to undertake a road trip, 35 percent of those surveyed responded that it would be “the fussy child”, followed by “the one who needs frequent bathroom breaks” (20%) and “the backseat driver” (16%).

Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

When asked how long they could go without needing to stop for a break, the average across those surveyed was five hours. However, when broken down by gender, the difference turned out to be substantial. While on average, women feel that they could go just over four hours between stops, while men claim that they can go almost an hour longer before having to pull over.

The Road Trip

The tradition of taking a road trip dates back about 3,000 years.

The first road trip likely occurred in ancient Egypt around 1200 B.C., when Ramses II hit the road in his chariot.

Similar ventures—using the well-loved automobile—began in Germany in the 1880s.

As the car’s popularity grew, so did the practice of taking to roadways for a carefree holiday.

The road trip became an easy, breezy travel idea that’s affordable and accessible—and in America today there is no shortage of highways, byways, and back roads.

Answering the call of the open road is practically an American rite of passage—and today more and more are taking to the open road in a recreational vehicle.

Anyone who has listened to John Denver sing about country roads and the Blue Ridge Mountains can easily imagine the transcendent beauty of Shenandoah National Park.
Anyone who has listened to John Denver sing about country roads and the Blue Ridge Mountains can easily imagine the transcendent beauty of Shenandoah National Park along the Blue Ridge Parkway. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

National Scenic Byways

So put the pedal to the metal, crank up those tunes, and roll down those windows to gaze upon America the beautiful as it rolls by.

Indulge your wanderlust on wheels while exploring the following National Scenic Byways.

Scenic Byway 12 (Utah)

Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. It runs through Utah’s Garfield and Wayne Counties and is home to Bryce Canyon and Capitol Reef National Parks; Kodachrome Basin, Escalante Petrified Forest, and Anasazi Museum State Parks; Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and the 1.8-million-acre Dixie National Forest.

Blue Ridge Parkway (Virginia and North Carolina)

The Blue Ridge Parkway provides spectacular mountain and valley vistas, quiet pastoral scenes, sparkling waterfalls, and colorful flower and foliage displays as it extends through the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia and North Carolina. Connecting two national parks—Shenandoah in Virginia with the Great Smoky Mountainsin North Carolina—the Blue Ridge Parkway traverses 469 miles through blue-misted Appalachian highlands.

Red Rock Scenic Byway (Arizona)

Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.” © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.” © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.” Travelers are amazed by the high desert’s power, diversity, and sense of intimacy with nature. Inhabited for thousands of years, the stunning red rocks are alive with a timeless spirit that captivates and inspires.

El Camino Real (New Mexico)

New Mexico’s El Camino Real passes by missions, historic sites, and a national wildlife refuge.

Cultures along El Camino Real De Tierra Adentro (The Royal Road of the Interior Land), are as diverse as its history and scenery. Pueblos reveal artisans crafting wares using centuries-old methods. First traveled by Don Juan de Onate in 1598, the route provided news, supplies, and travel to the first capital of the New World.

Worth Pondering…

Speed was high

Weather was hot

Tires were thin

X marks the spot

BURMA SHAVE

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All-American Road Trips

An estimated 34.8 million Americans will take a trip of 50 miles or more this weekend, according to AAA’s annual Memorial Day travel forecast.

Let's Go RVing on Scenic Byway 12, Utah. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

AAA projects an increase of 1.2 percent over last year’s 34.3 million travelers over the holiday weekend that runs today through Monday.

Indulge your wanderlust on wheels while exploring the following National Scenic Byways.

Scenic Byway 12 (Utah)

Scenic Byway 12 takes you to the heart of the American West.

This exceptional 124 mile route negotiates an isolated landscape of canyons, plateaus, and valleys ranging from 4,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level. You’ll encounter archaeological, cultural, historical, natural, recreational, and scenic qualities while driving this exhilarating byway.

Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. It runs through Utah’s Garfield and Wayne Counties and is home to Bryce Canyon and Capitol Reef National Parks; Kodachrome Basin, Escalante Petrified Forest, and Anasazi Museum State Parks; Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and the 1.8-million-acre Dixie National Forest.

Scenic Byway 12 has two entry points. The southwestern gateway is from U.S. Highway 89, seven miles south of the city of Panguitch. The northeastern gateway is from Highway 24 in the town of Torrey near Capitol Reef National Park.

Scenic Byway 12 takes visitors through memorable landscapes, ranging from the remains of ancient sea beds to one of the world’s highest alpine forests, and from astonishing pink and russet stone turrets to open sagebrush flats. The history and culture of the area blend together, making Scenic Byway 12 a journey like no other.

Red Rock Scenic Byway (Arizona)

Let's Go RVing on the Red Rock Scenic Byway, Arizona. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.”

Travelers are amazed by the high desert’s power, diversity, and sense of intimacy with nature. Inhabited for thousands of years, the stunning red rocks are alive with a timeless spirit that captivates and inspires.

This highly acclaimed National Scenic Byway, begins shortly after you exit #298 off I-17 and has earned the distinction of being Arizona’s First All-American Road! It winds through the evergreen pinion-covered Coconino National Forest, with several scenic pullouts, as well as through the extraordinary, prehistoric Red Rocks with nearby parking (RV friendly) and all levels of hiking and biking trails.

Although the Scenic Byway is only 7.5 miles, it is long on spectacular sights.

Sedona’s Red Rocks are comprised of sediment layers deposited over many millions of years. The shale foundation is the remainder of ancient swamp lands. Other layers are the remainder of an ancient beachfront that deposited iron about 275 million years ago. This iron is what gives Sedona’s rocks their rich red color.

The Coconino sandstone layer was formed at a time when Sahara-like dunes covered the majority of the Western U.S. The Red Rocks we see today were formed several million years ago when the uplifting of the Colorado Plateau that created the Grand Canyon also caused water to carve out Sedona’s red rock, cake-like layers.

El Camino Real (New Mexico)

Let's Go RVing along New Mexico’s El Camino Real. Pictured above is Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

New Mexico’s El Camino Real passes by missions, historic sites, and a national wildlife refuge.

Cultures along El Camino Real De Tierra Adentro (The Royal Road of the Interior Land), are as diverse as its history and scenery. Pueblos reveal artisans crafting wares using centuries-old methods. First traveled by Don Juan de Onate in 1598, the route provided news, supplies, and travel to the first capital of the New World.

El Camino Real crosses central New Mexico from Santa Fe to the Texas state line near El Paso. The 276-miles long byway follows a series of U.S. Highways and State Highways closely paralleling I-25. All the roads are two-lane paved roads suitable for all types of vehicles.

The scenic beauty of the byway is as diverse and colorful as its culture, history, and people.

From the low-lying flatlands of the south to the soaring peaks of the northern mountains, the terrain climbs 10,000 feet in elevation, creating a landscape of dramatic contrasts.

The El Camino Real and surrounding area is the postcard picture of desert beauty. Majestic mountain ranges with treacherous peaks wind through the desert, and low shrubs and cacti dot the earth.

The El Camino Real is an experience sure to leave an impression of the Southwest with you forever.

Please Note: This is Part 2 of a 2-part series on 5 Great All-American Road Trips

Part 1: Road Trips!

Worth Pondering…
People travel to wonder at the height of the mountains, at the huge waves of the seas, at the long course of the rivers, at the vast compass of the ocean, at the circular motion of the stars, and yet they pass by themselves without wondering.

—Saint Augustine

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Red Rock Scenic Byway Signage Goes Up

The Red Rock Ranger District of the Coconino National Forest will soon commence construction of six Red Rock Scenic Byway sign structures, several informational kiosks, and some trailhead improvements along a 7.5-mile section of State Route 179. The work is expected to take several months to complete.

Scenic Byway signs will be constructed at the north and south ends of the 7.5 mile stretch of SR 179, and at Courthouse Vista, Little Horse Trail, Bell Rock Vista, and Yavapai Point Vista.

Various improvements at Yavapai Point Vista will also occur, including the construction of a pathway to vista points, and the installation of interpretive panels. A temporary 60-day closure of Yavapai Point Vista will be in place during the construction period; all other sites will remain open, reports US Forest Service in a recent news release.

The Scenic Byway signs will be constructed of natural red rock and rustic appearing steel to blend in with the surrounding landscape and local architecture.

This section of SR 179 is special because in 2006, the US Dept. of Transportation recognized its uniqueness by giving it All American Road status, the highest designation within the National Scenic Byways Program. To date, this section of 179 remains the only All American Road in the State of Arizona.

Nationally, there are 125 National Scenic Byways in 44 states, but only 36 of the Byways, including the Red Rock Scenic Byway or “Gateway to Sedona”, have additionally earned the prestigious All-American Road designation.

This project is being funded through the National Scenic Byway grant program and was awarded to the Red Rock Ranger District.

The public may experience some inconvenience during the construction period, in and around construction sites.

Details

Red Rock Scenic Byway

Length: 7.5 miles

Time to Allow: Take 20 minutes to drive, but allow several hours to include all activities along the byway.

Website: redrockscenicbyway.com

Coconino National Forest

The Coconino National Forest is one of the most diverse national forests in the country with landscapes ranging from the famous Red Rocks of Sedona to ponderosa pine forests, to alpine tundra. Explore mountains and canyons, fish forest lakes, and wade in lazy creeks and streams.

Website: fs.usda.gov/coconino

Red Rock District Coconino National Forest

Location: 8375 State Route 179, Sedona, Arizona (just south of the Village of Oak Creek)

Address: P. O. Box 20429, Sedona, AZ 86341-0429

Administrative Offices: (928) 203-7500

Visitor Center: (928) 203-2900

Note: This is the second of a two-part series on the Red Rock Scenic Byway

Part 1: Exploring Red Rock Scenic Byway

Worth Pondering…

God created the Grand Canyon, but he lives in Sedona.

—New York Times, 1997

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Exploring Red Rock Scenic Byway

The National Forest/Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center

Your first must-stop is the beautiful Forest Service Red Rock Ranger Visitor Center, located just south of the Village of Oak Creek on SR 179.

This is Red Rock Country. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Get maps and tons of Red Rock Country “fun things to do” information, as well as your Red Rock Pass for trailhead parking. Learn all the stories and history of this amazing area, like how the rocks and mesas were formed and named.

Red Rock Crossing on Oak Creek

As you leave the Visitors Center driveway, turn north (left) on SR 179 and you’ll see a major intersection with a stoplight. Turn west (left) onto Verde Valley School Road and drive 4.7 miles where the road dead-ends at the Red Rock Crossing parking lot. Do not park anywhere but the parking lot. This road travels through residential areas so be aware of the 30-35 mph speed limit; also, for the last 1.2 miles, the road is unpaved as well as curvy, hilly, and subject to flooding after excessive rains.

From the parking lot, it is a very short walk to the pathway that will lead you down to the unique red rock banks of Oak Creek.

Don’t forget your camera, because you’re at one of the most photographed sites in the country as well as one of the most naturally beautiful settings in Sedona.

If it’s a Saturday, chances are there’s a small wedding taking place at the north end of the crossing. Most days there will be artists painting or photographers setting up their shots or people just soaking up the inspiring view.

Tourists come from around the world to absorb the natural wonders of Red Rock Country. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If the creek water’s low enough, step across the red rock stepping stones, which is the crossing, to Red Rock State Park situated on the other side.

Bell Rock Vista and Pathway Southern Trailhead

Turn east (right) out of the Red Rock Crossing parking lot and take Verde Valley School Road 4.7 miles back to its stoplight intersection with SR 179, where you will turn north (left).

Proceed straight, through the Village of Oak Creek, and just past the next stoplight, on your right hand side, will be the entrance to the Bell Rock Vista and Pathway parking lot.

Here’s where you’ll discover the size and power of the red rocks; this is a travelers up close experience with mystical Bell Rock and mammoth Courthouse Butte. Feel the red rock energy and enjoy the views.

There are many pathways to choose from, all going to or near Bell Rock that can be done in a half hour or as long as you feel like walking.

Little Horse Trail and Bell Rock Pathway Northern Trailhead

Turn north (or right) out of the parking lot onto SR 179; proceed straight and be on the lookout for signs that say “Little Horse Trail” and “Bell Rock Pathway”; entrance to this stop’s parking lot will come up fairly quickly, on your right.

Discover a little serenity among the glorious hiking and biking trails that meander to hidden washes and breathtaking red rock panoramas.

Little Horse Trail is a local favorite, rated moderate, and 6.5 miles if you do the full round trip. Remember the rules of the trail, and have fun!

Also at this stop, view the “Three Nuns” with the renowned Chapel of the Holy Cross perched below.

Finished in 1956, Chapel of the Holy Cross sits atop a pinnacle 250 feet above the valley floor. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Officially, the scenic road ends just beyond this point so after your hike, and before resuming your drive, take a moment to look west and gaze upon famous Cathedral Rock, a huge rock formation with multiple red rock spires. Whether it is silhouetted against a glowing sunset or shining in the midday sun, it is considered one of the most beautiful of all the red rock formations in the Sedona area, and surely a fitting way to end your day of Red Rock Splendor.

Note: This is the first of a two-part series on Red Rock Scenic Byway

Part 2: Red Rock Scenic Byway Signage Goes Up

Worth Pondering…

There are only two places in the world

I want to live—Sedona and Paris.

—Max Ernst, Surrealist painter

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