Is Your RV Ready For The Holiday Weekend?

This weekend marks the start of the camping season and that means getting your RV road ready for new adventures.

One of over 2,000 arches in Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
One of over 2,000 arches in Arches National Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

AAA travel projects 37.2 million Americans will journey 50 miles or more from home for Memorial Weekend. That’s the highest travel volume for Memorial Day in 10 years.

To make sure you have a safe journey to your destination, there are several things you should do before heading out on the road.

The first is to make sure your RV is in working order.

This is the time to give your RV a bath. Washing the rig will allow you to get up-close and personal with areas that are often out of sight—and thus—out of mind.

Always start on the roof. Exercise care when walking on the roof, especially if wet. Pay close attention to the rubber membrane for any cracks or deterioration of the white surface coating.

Look carefully for any deterioration in the caulking around vents, seams, antennas, and roof-mounted satellite dish. Also inspect the plastic vent lids and skylights for sunlight
deterioration and cracks.

Washing the RV and rinsing thoroughly around the windows will help locate possible leaks. Carefully inspect window seals and caulking around compartments and accessories.

Discover Okanagan Valley © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Now, let’s go RVing to the beautiful Okanagan Valley in British Columbia. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Routine tire inspection is a critical part of regular maintenance as well as an integral procedure during the spring checkup. Check the date of manufacture from the D.O.T. code that is located on the outside tire sidewall. Every tire contains the week and year of manufacture.

The general rule of thumb is that motorhome and trailer tires will age-out after seven years, regardless of tread condition. During inspection, check every tire for cuts, cracks, or bubbles — including the inside sidewall.

Inflate tires to the correct air pressure. To determine the proper pressure, either refer to the RV manufacturer’s weight label (assuming the RV is not overloaded) or weigh the wheels individually and consult the tire manufacturer’s load and inflation tables.

Check the LP-gas, smoke, and carbon-monoxide warning detectors. Start by replacing the battery in the smoke detector (which should be done once a year). Push the test button in each device to check for proper operation. Most of these detectors will not last the lifetime of your RV; check with the manufacturer, or look on the back of the detector to see if there’s an expiration date.

And don’t forget the fire extinguisher. It should be tested and replaced according to the manufacturer’s timeline as well.

Historic Mesilla © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Historic Mesilla, near Las Cruces, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Test the microwave oven. Using a glass of water, run the microwave for two minutes and be sure the water reaches a point of near boiling.

Using a flashlight look for signs of moisture inside your cupboards and closets. Also be on the lookout for mold and mildew. Check under the galley, and open all drawers and inspect behind them with the flashlight as well. Look for mice nests or dead critters.

If you don’t have one already, pack an emergency kit with non-perishable food, a flashlight, a first aid kit, and drinking water.

Once your RV is ready to go, make sure you have all the equipment you will need. The smaller battery operated vacuum cleaners take little storage space and are available for that quick cleanup when needed.

This is also the time to update and add some new features to your RV. There are many new accessories on the market to add to the experience. Big this year are LED lights. They are popular in the RV industry simply because they hardly use any energy.

Taking the time to give your RV a thorough spring checkup will make for much more enjoyable travels. And finding the little problems before they become big headaches also keeps more money in your pocket.

Getting out with your family, hitting the reset button, going camping, unwinding and relaxation, and spending quality time with your family—that is what it is all about.

Bisbee © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Historic Bisbee in southeastern Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

And the golden rule: don’t pass up the opportunities along the way to explore and see something new.

Worth Pondering…

The journey not the arrival matters.

—T. S. Eliot

Read More

More Americans To Take Summer Road Trip

Memorial Day is the unofficial start of summer and kicks off summer vacation planning season. More Americans will take to the roads this year as they benefit from the low fuel prices.

travelocity-road-trip-infographicAccording to a recent Travelocity survey of 1000 Americans, 65 percent of those polled stated that they were more likely to take a road trip this summer compared to last summer.

While it’s clear that low fuel prices are likely driving Americans to take more road trips, Travelocity’s survey also looked at why road trips are still popular when it comes to travel.

While the majority of those surveyed replied that the destination is what they most look forward to, a full one-third of those polled felt that the best part of a road trip is the journey itself.

This sentiment was echoed by a number of Travelocity customers who were asked what they loved most about going on road trips. According to one veteran Travelocity customer, sharing and enjoying their favorite music on the road by “making road trip mixes” is the best part of a road trip, while another noted that it is “…fun to pull over to random roadside attractions. Those usually create long lasting memories and stories that will forever commemorate the trip.”

When asked about what person with whom they would least want to undertake a road trip, 35 percent of those surveyed responded that it would be “the fussy child”, followed by “the one who needs frequent bathroom breaks” (20%) and “the backseat driver” (16%).

Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

When asked how long they could go without needing to stop for a break, the average across those surveyed was five hours. However, when broken down by gender, the difference turned out to be substantial. While on average, women feel that they could go just over four hours between stops, while men claim that they can go almost an hour longer before having to pull over.

The Road Trip

The tradition of taking a road trip dates back about 3,000 years.

The first road trip likely occurred in ancient Egypt around 1200 B.C., when Ramses II hit the road in his chariot.

Similar ventures—using the well-loved automobile—began in Germany in the 1880s.

As the car’s popularity grew, so did the practice of taking to roadways for a carefree holiday.

The road trip became an easy, breezy travel idea that’s affordable and accessible—and in America today there is no shortage of highways, byways, and back roads.

Answering the call of the open road is practically an American rite of passage—and today more and more are taking to the open road in a recreational vehicle.

Anyone who has listened to John Denver sing about country roads and the Blue Ridge Mountains can easily imagine the transcendent beauty of Shenandoah National Park.
Anyone who has listened to John Denver sing about country roads and the Blue Ridge Mountains can easily imagine the transcendent beauty of Shenandoah National Park along the Blue Ridge Parkway. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

National Scenic Byways

So put the pedal to the metal, crank up those tunes, and roll down those windows to gaze upon America the beautiful as it rolls by.

Indulge your wanderlust on wheels while exploring the following National Scenic Byways.

Scenic Byway 12 (Utah)

Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. It runs through Utah’s Garfield and Wayne Counties and is home to Bryce Canyon and Capitol Reef National Parks; Kodachrome Basin, Escalante Petrified Forest, and Anasazi Museum State Parks; Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and the 1.8-million-acre Dixie National Forest.

Blue Ridge Parkway (Virginia and North Carolina)

The Blue Ridge Parkway provides spectacular mountain and valley vistas, quiet pastoral scenes, sparkling waterfalls, and colorful flower and foliage displays as it extends through the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia and North Carolina. Connecting two national parks—Shenandoah in Virginia with the Great Smoky Mountainsin North Carolina—the Blue Ridge Parkway traverses 469 miles through blue-misted Appalachian highlands.

Red Rock Scenic Byway (Arizona)

Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.” © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.” © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.” Travelers are amazed by the high desert’s power, diversity, and sense of intimacy with nature. Inhabited for thousands of years, the stunning red rocks are alive with a timeless spirit that captivates and inspires.

El Camino Real (New Mexico)

New Mexico’s El Camino Real passes by missions, historic sites, and a national wildlife refuge.

Cultures along El Camino Real De Tierra Adentro (The Royal Road of the Interior Land), are as diverse as its history and scenery. Pueblos reveal artisans crafting wares using centuries-old methods. First traveled by Don Juan de Onate in 1598, the route provided news, supplies, and travel to the first capital of the New World.

Worth Pondering…

Speed was high

Weather was hot

Tires were thin

X marks the spot

BURMA SHAVE

Read More

Planning an RV Rental Vacation

Recreational vehicles have become one of the most popular ways for Americans and Canadians to travel.

rent an rv
Considering the RV lifestyle? Try renting before laying down the cash. Camping in a rental Class C motorhome at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

There is no time wasted rushing through the airport and dealing with delays or cancellations. Even with today’s fuel prices, RV travel is still a more economical way for families to travel than staying in hotels and eating in restaurants.

An RV vacation lets you determine your daily itinerary. Stop and stretch when you’re ready; enjoy drinks and snacks when you choose; use your own bathroom when public facilities are unavailable or unsanitary.

An RV vacation offers you the ultimate freedom to travel and explore at your own pace. You have complete control over your destination plans, including when you depart, where you travel, and what you do during your family vacation.

There are many destinations you can go as a family when taking an RV road trip. These types of vacations make it possible for families to enjoy the great outdoors, see historical sites, and spend time together sitting around the campfire. When selecting a destination, it is important to ensure there are ample activities to involve the entire family.

You can tour the continent from the Canadian Rockies to Arizona and from California to Texas, Alabama, and Georgia and everywhere in between.

RV sales continue to be strong. Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA) reports that RV manufacturers shipped almost 286,000 vehicles in 2012, with a retail value of more than $10.8 billion.

Touring Jasper National with a Fraserway RV rental
Touring Jasper National with a Fraserway RV rental. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Thanks to the popularity, RV rentals have also seen a boost.

There’s no better way to try before you buy than by renting an RV. Many people rent RVs simply for a change of pace by taking an RV trip to a special destination or event such as football tailgating or Mardi Gras.

You can rent near home and journey to your destination, or fly and pick up your RV at the other end. More than 460 national chain outlets and local RV dealerships rent RVs, including state-of-the-art, late-model-year units. A growing number of campgrounds offer on-site RV rentals as well.

Selecting the right RV rental company will take considerable research and price comparison. Before choosing a rental company, take time to speak to each company in your area to get a price quote and find out what is included with the rental.

RV rentals are available through both local and national companies. Some of the more popular national RV rental companies include Cruise America, El Monte RV, USA RV Rentals, and Camping World. The major rental companies in Canada include Canadream and Cruise Canada.

Most RV rental companies offer housekeeping packages (dishes, pots, pans, bed linens, etc.) for a nominal fee, or you can bring your own. Even if you’re driving or towing an RV for the first time, features like automatic transmissions, power steering, large external mirrors, and rear view cameras make it easy for experienced drivers to adjust to the difference in length, height, and weight.

Book your RV well in advance, especially if you plan to travel during the summer or on busy holiday weekends such as Memorial Day or Labor Day. These are the busiest times of the year.

Airstream trailer now available as a rental unit at Larimer County’s Horsetooth Reservoir South Bay Campground (Credit: Steve Stoner)
Airstream trailer now available as a rental unit at Larimer County’s Horsetooth Reservoir South Bay Campground (Credit: Steve Stoner)

Pre-select a few destinations and take a look at your budget. Though the cost of parking the RV for the night is less expensive than staying at a hotel, the costs for fuel and mileage can add up quickly.

Have a destination in mind before calling the RV rental company and ask for a total estimate, including rental fee and average mileage charges. Ask for several different destinations to compare rates and finally pick a location for your vacation.

It is important you understand your rights and responsibilities before signing an RV rental agreement.

When taking delivery of your rented RV, allow ample time to ensure everything is in working order and you are familiar with the operation all major systems including utility hookups (electrical, water, and sewer). Make sure you know how to hook these up before you leave on vacation and all required attachments are supplied. Check the smoke and carbon monoxide detectors to ensure they are operational.

Check for any manuals that can help answer questions along the way and look for any noticeable damage. Make sure to point out any damage or missing items to the rental agency before leaving. This way you are not responsible for the items.

Make a check list of everything you need for your RV vacation, including what to bring and what to do before leaving.

Renting an RV is a great way to test drive the RV lifestyle experience.

Worth Pondering…

The attraction of recreational vehicle travel is to see the country, visit new places, meet interesting people, and experience the freedom of the open road.

Read More

Honoring All Who Served

Many Americans mistakenly believe that Veterans Day is the day America sets aside to honor American military personnel who died in battle or as a result of wounds sustained from combat. That’s not quite true. Memorial Day is the day set aside to honor America’s war dead.

veteransdayVeterans Day, on the other hand, honors ALL American veterans, both living and dead. In fact, Veterans Day is largely intended to thank LIVING veterans for dedicated and loyal service to their country. November 11 of each year is the day that we ensure veterans know that we deeply appreciate the sacrifices they have made in the lives to keep our country free.

World War I officially ended on June 28, 1919, with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles. The actual fighting between the Allies and Germany, however, had ended seven months earlier with the armistice, which went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918.

Armistice Day, as November 11 became known, officially became a holiday in the United States in 1926, and a national holiday 12 years later. On June 1, 1954, the name was changed to Veterans Day to honor all U.S. veterans.

In 1968, new legislation changed the national commemoration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. It soon became apparent, however, that November 11 was a date of historic significance to many Americans. Therefore, in 1978 Congress returned the observance to its traditional date.

Thank you veterans!

Worth Pondering…

While only one day of the year is dedicated solely to honoring our veterans, Americans must never forget the sacrifices that many of our fellow countrymen have made to defend our country and protect our freedoms.

—Randy Neugebaue

Read More

All-American Road Trips

An estimated 34.8 million Americans will take a trip of 50 miles or more this weekend, according to AAA’s annual Memorial Day travel forecast.

Let's Go RVing on Scenic Byway 12, Utah. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

AAA projects an increase of 1.2 percent over last year’s 34.3 million travelers over the holiday weekend that runs today through Monday.

Indulge your wanderlust on wheels while exploring the following National Scenic Byways.

Scenic Byway 12 (Utah)

Scenic Byway 12 takes you to the heart of the American West.

This exceptional 124 mile route negotiates an isolated landscape of canyons, plateaus, and valleys ranging from 4,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level. You’ll encounter archaeological, cultural, historical, natural, recreational, and scenic qualities while driving this exhilarating byway.

Scenic Byway 12 travels through some of the most diverse, remote and ruggedly beautiful landscapes in the country. It runs through Utah’s Garfield and Wayne Counties and is home to Bryce Canyon and Capitol Reef National Parks; Kodachrome Basin, Escalante Petrified Forest, and Anasazi Museum State Parks; Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, and the 1.8-million-acre Dixie National Forest.

Scenic Byway 12 has two entry points. The southwestern gateway is from U.S. Highway 89, seven miles south of the city of Panguitch. The northeastern gateway is from Highway 24 in the town of Torrey near Capitol Reef National Park.

Scenic Byway 12 takes visitors through memorable landscapes, ranging from the remains of ancient sea beds to one of the world’s highest alpine forests, and from astonishing pink and russet stone turrets to open sagebrush flats. The history and culture of the area blend together, making Scenic Byway 12 a journey like no other.

Red Rock Scenic Byway (Arizona)

Let's Go RVing on the Red Rock Scenic Byway, Arizona. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Red Rock Scenic Byway winds through Sedona’s Red Rock Country, often called a “museum without walls.”

Travelers are amazed by the high desert’s power, diversity, and sense of intimacy with nature. Inhabited for thousands of years, the stunning red rocks are alive with a timeless spirit that captivates and inspires.

This highly acclaimed National Scenic Byway, begins shortly after you exit #298 off I-17 and has earned the distinction of being Arizona’s First All-American Road! It winds through the evergreen pinion-covered Coconino National Forest, with several scenic pullouts, as well as through the extraordinary, prehistoric Red Rocks with nearby parking (RV friendly) and all levels of hiking and biking trails.

Although the Scenic Byway is only 7.5 miles, it is long on spectacular sights.

Sedona’s Red Rocks are comprised of sediment layers deposited over many millions of years. The shale foundation is the remainder of ancient swamp lands. Other layers are the remainder of an ancient beachfront that deposited iron about 275 million years ago. This iron is what gives Sedona’s rocks their rich red color.

The Coconino sandstone layer was formed at a time when Sahara-like dunes covered the majority of the Western U.S. The Red Rocks we see today were formed several million years ago when the uplifting of the Colorado Plateau that created the Grand Canyon also caused water to carve out Sedona’s red rock, cake-like layers.

El Camino Real (New Mexico)

Let's Go RVing along New Mexico’s El Camino Real. Pictured above is Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

New Mexico’s El Camino Real passes by missions, historic sites, and a national wildlife refuge.

Cultures along El Camino Real De Tierra Adentro (The Royal Road of the Interior Land), are as diverse as its history and scenery. Pueblos reveal artisans crafting wares using centuries-old methods. First traveled by Don Juan de Onate in 1598, the route provided news, supplies, and travel to the first capital of the New World.

El Camino Real crosses central New Mexico from Santa Fe to the Texas state line near El Paso. The 276-miles long byway follows a series of U.S. Highways and State Highways closely paralleling I-25. All the roads are two-lane paved roads suitable for all types of vehicles.

The scenic beauty of the byway is as diverse and colorful as its culture, history, and people.

From the low-lying flatlands of the south to the soaring peaks of the northern mountains, the terrain climbs 10,000 feet in elevation, creating a landscape of dramatic contrasts.

The El Camino Real and surrounding area is the postcard picture of desert beauty. Majestic mountain ranges with treacherous peaks wind through the desert, and low shrubs and cacti dot the earth.

The El Camino Real is an experience sure to leave an impression of the Southwest with you forever.

Please Note: This is Part 2 of a 2-part series on 5 Great All-American Road Trips

Part 1: Road Trips!

Worth Pondering…
People travel to wonder at the height of the mountains, at the huge waves of the seas, at the long course of the rivers, at the vast compass of the ocean, at the circular motion of the stars, and yet they pass by themselves without wondering.

—Saint Augustine

Read More

Road trip!

It’s the Memorial Day long weekend—the unofficial start of summer—and for many travel-wise Americans that means one thing: Road trip!

Let's Go RVing on the Blue Ridge Parkway, Virginia. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The tradition of taking a road trip dates back about 3,000 years.

The first road trip likely occurred in ancient Egypt around 1200 B.C., when Ramses II hit the road in his chariot.

Similar ventures—using the well-loved automobile—began in Germany in the 1880s.

As the car’s popularity grew, so did the practice of taking to roadways for a carefree holiday.

The road trip became an easy, breezy travel idea that’s affordable and accessible—and in America today there is no shortage of highways, byways, and back roads.

Answering the call of the open road is practically an American rite of passage—and today more and more are taking to the open road in a recreational vehicle.

5 Great All-American Road Trips

These 10 distinctive all-American road trips, inclusive of both roads less traveled and tried-and-true, pave the way through the country’s finest landscapes, from the Appalachians to the heart of the American West to Arizona’s Red Rock Country—and beyond.

So put the pedal to the metal, crank up those tunes, and roll down those windows to gaze upon America the beautiful as it rolls by.

Indulge your wanderlust on wheels while exploring the following National Scenic Byways.

Blue Ridge Parkway (Virginia and North Carolina)

The Blue Ridge Parkway provides spectacular mountain and valley vistas, quiet pastoral scenes, sparkling waterfalls, and colorful flower and foliage displays as it extends through the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia and North Carolina.

Connecting two national parks—Shenandoah in Virginia with the Great Smoky Mountains in North Carolina—the Blue Ridge Parkway traverses 469 miles through blue-misted Appalachian highlands. Take in forest-blanketed mountain vistas, ripe for fauna (look for bear, deer, and beaver) and flora viewing (interesting factoid: the parkway’s namesake “blue” haze is attributed to the hydrocarbon release from the some 130 tree species).
Picnic areas, campgrounds, hiking trails, and visitor’s centers, offering programs like ranger-guided walks, abound.

Let's Go RVing on the Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Come in late spring for wildflower blooms (rhododendron, azalea); or, in fall (especially around mid-October) for Technicolor foliage displays.

Cherohala Skyway National Scenic Byway (North Carolina and Tennessee)

The Cherohala Skyway offers the cultural heritage of the Cherokee tribe and early settlers in a grand forest environment in the Appalachian Mountains.

Enjoy mile-high vistas and brilliant fall foliage, as well as great hiking opportunities and picnic spots in magnificent and seldom-seen portions of the southern Appalachian National Forests.

The Cherohala Skyway crosses through the Cherokee National Forest in Tennessee and the Nantahala National Forest in North Carolina. The name “Cherohala” comes from the names of the two National Forests: “Chero” from the Cherokee and “hala” from the Nantahala.

The Cherohala Skyway is located in southeast Tennessee and southwest North Carolina. The Skyway connects Tellico Plains, Tennessee, with Robbinsville, North Carolina, and is about 40+ miles long. The Cherohala Skyway is a wide, paved two-laned road maintained by the Tennessee Department of Transportation and the North Carolina Department of Transportation.

Let's Go RVing on the Cherohala Skyway, North Carolina. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The elevations range from 900 feet above sea level at the Tellico River in Tennessee to over 5,400 feet above sea level at the Tennessee-North Carolina state line at Haw Knob.

Please Note: This is Part 1 of a 2-part series on 5 Great All-American Road Trips

Part 2: All-American Road Trips

Worth Pondering…
Climb the mountains and get their good tidings.

Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees.

The winds will flow their own freshness into you and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.

—John Muir

Read More

RVC Outdoor Destinations Launches Wounded Warrior Fishing Partnership

Memphis, Tennessee-based RVC Outdoor Destinations, the leading provider of high-quality outdoor vacation properties in the United States, announced the launch of its Wounded Warrior Fishing sponsorship, an initiative underscoring the company’s commitment to active and retired military personnel.

RVC Outdoor Destinations has partnered with retired U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. and current U.S. Coast Guard Capt. Mark McDuffie, to offer the program, which is designed to help soldiers injured physically or mentally in Iraq or Afghanistan relax and enjoy the outdoors with their families, according to a news release.

The Wounded Warrior Fishing program, headquartered at the company’s Live Oak Landing property in Freeport, Florida, will host an injured soldier and his or her family one night each week to enjoy the outdoors through activities such as fishing trips, river tours, onsite recreation activities and a cookout—all free of charge.

McDuffie first started the program a year ago, as a nonprofit called Wounded Warrior Fishing. Injured while fighting in Iraq and now fully recovered, McDuffie operates at the Live Oak Landing property and will head up the new partnership sponsored by RVC.

“Having been wounded at war, I can relate to what many of these injured soldiers are going through,” said McDuffie.

“I know that when soldiers suffer, their families do too, and while I can’t take away their pain or completely understand their particular situation, I can offer them time to relax with their families. At the end of the day, if we can put a smile on their faces for a few hours or for a weekend, we’ve done our job.”

Wounded Warrior Fishing and RVC will officially kick-off the program on Memorial Day weekend to coincide with the unofficial start of the summer travel season.

In addition to the weekly sponsored accommodations, Live Oak Landing will host 10 injured soldiers and their families during an end-of-summer celebration the last weekend of September. The group will be able to fish with local professionals, take boat rides on the Choctawhatchee Bay, eat BBQ from local restaurants, enjoy massages, and relax.

Besides the new Wounded Warrior Fishing sponsorship, RVC also offers active and retired military discounts on lodging, and several of its properties offer a free RV site rental for active service men and women through the Tents for Troops program.

RVC locations individually raise money for regionally based military charities through their own events and fundraisers throughout the year.

“RVC believes in taking care of the military men and women who have made a tremendous sacrifice for our country,” said Andy Cates, president of RVC Outdoor Destinations.

“We wanted to find a meaningful way to say ‘thank you,’ and for us that means giving them a chance to have some fun in the great outdoors with their families. The Wounded Warrior Fishing program is part of RVC’s corporate commitment to give back to these brave individuals. At each of our properties, we have different ways of reaching out to the military community, knowing that each region has unique needs. We’re always searching for new ways to show them how truly grateful we are for everything they have done, for all of us.”

Details

RVC Outdoor Destinations

RVC Outdoor Destinations develops, owns, and operates a portfolio of high-quality outdoor vacation properties located within some of the country’s most beautiful natural settings and offering upscale services and amenities.

Memphis, Tennessee-based RVC is redefining the traditional camping experience with its original Outdoor Destination concept that provides guests with a customizable outdoor vacation through a variety of affordable lodging options, including RV sites, yurts, cabins and cottages, all with enhanced guest amenities and recreational activities.

RVC currently operates Outdoor Destinations and RV Resorts in Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Florida, and North Carolina.

Address: 429 N Main Street, Suite 100, Memphis, Tennessee 38103

Phone: (901) 432-4748

Website: rvcoutdoors.com

Wounded Warrior Fishing Program

To nominate someone for the Wounded Warrior Fishing program, please call RVC’s Live Oak Landing at (877) 436-5063.

Wounded Warrior Project

The mission of Wounded Warrior Project (WWP) is to honor and empower wounded warriors. The purpose of WWP is to raise awareness and to enlist the public’s aid for the needs of injured service members; to help injured servicemen and women aid and assist each other; and to provide unique, direct programs and services to meet their needs. WWP is a national, non-partisan organization headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida.

Address: 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 300, Jacksonville, Florida 32256

Phone: (904) 296-7350 or (877) TEAM.WWP (832.6997)

Website: woundedwarriorproject.org

Worth Pondering…

Life is a succession of moments. To live each one is to succeed.

—Conita Kent

Read More

More Drivers to Take Memorial Day Road Trip

More Americans will take to the roads during the upcoming Memorial Day weekend this year as they benefit from a recent drop in pump prices, heralding a summer of strong fuel demand.

Approximately 30.7 million Americans plan to drive to destinations 50 miles or more away from home between May 24 and 28, the start of the peak driving season in the United States, according to a survey released Tuesday (May 15) by AAA.

This represents an increase of more than 500,000 travelers on the road or 1.2 percent from the 30.3 million who drove last year, which serves as an early gauge of summer gasoline sales at pumping stations.

Almost nine out of ten holiday travelers (88 percent) will take to the nation’s roadways during the Memorial Day weekend keeping automobile travel in the traditional lead as the dominate mode of holiday travel transportation, according to the organization, which provides roadside and travel services.

“The overall domestic economic picture continues to improve slightly, however, American consumers faced a new challenge this year as steadily increasing gas prices throughout the spring significantly squeezed many household budgets,” said AAA President and CEO Robert L. Darbelnet.

“Americans will still travel during the Memorial Day holiday weekend but, many will compensate for reduced travel budgets by staying closer to home and cutting entertainment dollars.”

A survey of intended travelers found that 53 percent said recent increases in gasoline prices would not impact their Memorial Day holiday travel plans. Of the remaining 47 percent of travelers who said gas prices would impact their travel plans, nine percent are planning to take a shorter trip, four percent will travel by an alternate mode of transportation, and 34 percent will economize in other areas.

Approximately 30.7 million Americans plan to drive to destinations 50 miles or more away from home during the upcoming Memorial Day weekend. (Source: wsj.com)

National gasoline prices may have peaked in April despite seasonal highs in early spring when motorists experienced average price increases for all but four days in February and March.

April experienced a full reversal as prices fell for 23 of 30 days during the month, helping to break a streak of 911 days since the national average price was lower than the previous year.

The current national average price for a gallon of regular gasoline is approximately 25 cents lower than this time last year. U.S. gasoline prices averaged $3.73 a gallon on Tuesday, compared with $3.96 a year ago.

According to a survey of traveler intentions, the average distance traveled by Americans during the Memorial Day holiday weekend is expected to be 642 miles, which is 150 miles less than last year’s average travel distance of 792 miles. With high gas prices squeezing consumers’ spending power this spring, consumers are responding by traveling shorter distances this Memorial Day holiday.

The decline in expected air travel is a factor in the travel distance decrease as fewer flying miles can be contrasted with the slight growth in automobile travel. Miles flown for weekend travel are typically longer than those driven.

Median spending is expected to be $702, only slightly more than the $692 median spending last year.

Details

American Automobile Association (AAA)

The American Automobile Association (the “AAA” or “Triple-A”) was founded on March 4, 1902, in Chicago, when, in response to a lack of roads and highways suitable for automobiles, nine motor clubs with a total of 1,500 members banded together to form the Triple-A.

Travelers get an early start on the Memorial Day holiday weekend. (Source: msnbc.msn.com)

As North America’s largest motoring and leisure travel organization, AAA provides more than 53 million members with travel, insurance, financial, and automotive-related services.

Its national headquarters are in Heathrow, Florida.

AAA’s digital tools for travel planning ‘on the go’ include eTourBook guides for 101 top North American destinations, free to members at AAA.com/ebooks. Choose from city titles, like Orlando, New York, and Las Vegas, as well as National Parks.

Free AAA apps for iPhone and Android devices use GPS navigation to help travelers map a route, locate nearby member discounts, and find current gas prices.

Worth Pondering…

Speed was high

Weather was hot

Tires were thin

X marks the spot

BURMA SHAVE

Read More