50 Spectacular RV Trips

You might have read it or flipped through it or seen it on a shelf and thought, “I should pick that up.”

A Blue Ridge Parkway experience is unlike any other, a slow-paced and relaxing drive revealing stunning long-range vistas and close-up views of the rugged mountains and pastoral landscapes of the Appalachian Highlands. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
A Blue Ridge Parkway experience is unlike any other, a slow-paced and relaxing drive revealing stunning long-range vistas and close-up views of the rugged mountains and pastoral landscapes of the Appalachian Highlands. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

It’s the national bestseller, “1,000 Places to See Before You Die.”

Sometimes the best adventures are those in your own backyard.

Here, in alphabetical order, are 50 things to do or see in your RV before you die:

Blue Ridge Parkway, North Carolina & Virginia

The Blue Ridge Parkway is a National Parkway and All-American Road noted for its scenic beauty.

Meandering 469 miles from Shenandoah National Park in the northern Shenandoah Valley of Virginia to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina, the Parkway follows the Appalachian Mountains and boasts some of the most spectacular scenery in the world. It runs through the famous Blue Ridge Mountains, a major mountain chain that is part of the Appalachian Mountains.

Brenham Creamery Company, Texas

Blue Bell ice cream is an icon in Texas. I consider ice cream to be a food group—and there’s no better ice cream available than Blue Bell.

In 1907, the Brenham Creamery Company opened its doors to sell butter. By 1911, they had put together milk, cream, eggs, and fruit fresh from local farmers and were making a gallon or two of ice cream daily, packing it in a large wooden tub with ice and salt, and delivering it by horse and wagon to neighbors. By 1930, Blue Bell Creameries had been born, and today their ice cream is a true Texas favorite.

What makes an exceptionally good thing good? For the answer, visit “the little creamery” in Brenham—I think you’ll find out.

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Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

Bryce Canyon's limestone has eroded into rock fins and spectacularly-shaped spires called hoodoos. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Bryce Canyon’s limestone has eroded into rock fins and spectacularly-shaped spires called hoodoos. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Bryce Canyon National Park is actually less of a canyon than it is a series of natural amphitheaters sunk into pink cliffs and filled with delicate red rock “hoodoos.”

Millions of years of wind, water, and geologic forces have shaped and etched the surreal landscape. The most brilliant hues of the park come alive with the rising and setting of the sun. Bryce is an unforgettable experience. The 37-mile scenic drive will also get you to key overlooks and vistas, such as Sunrise, Sunset, Rainbow, Yovimpa, and Inspiration Point.

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Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona

A comparatively little-known canyon, Canyon de Chelly has sheer sandstone walls rising up to 1,000 feet, scenic overlooks, well-preserved Anasazi ruins, and an insight into the present day life of the Navajo, who still inhabit and cultivate the valley floor.

The northernmost and southernmost edges are accessible from paved roads—the North and South Rim drives. The South Rim Drive offers the most dramatic vistas, ending at the most spectacular viewpoint, the overlook of Spider Rocks—twin 800 foot towers of rock isolated from the canyon walls and a site of special significance for the Navajo.

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Canyonlands National Park, Utah

Canyonlands National Park covers a vast area of rock wilderness in southeastern Utah. Over millions of years, the rivers and their small tributaries have carved the flat sandstone rock layers into many amazing forms with a wide range of colors.

The 530 square miles of the park contain countless canyons, arches, spires, buttes, mesas, and a myriad of other spectacular rock formations.

The Island in the Sky region of Canyonlands is a wide high plateau with commanding views across many miles of deep canyons in all directions. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
The Island in the Sky region of Canyonlands is a wide high plateau with commanding views across many miles of deep canyons in all directions. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The sheer unbridgeable canyons of the Green and Colorado rivers divide Canyonlands into three distinct sections—Island in the Sky, The Needles, and The Maze—which differ in the types of landscape found there, the number of visitors and the available facilities.

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Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Cape Cod juts out from Massachusetts, extending 70 miles into the Atlantic Ocean. The Cape and the islands of Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard offer miles of glorious ocean beaches, quaint villages, art galleries, outdoor recreation including biking, hiking, and golf. Lighthouses, grassy dunes, whales, salt marshes, seafood, cottages, resorts, shopping, restaurants, clam bakes, pubs, galleries and, oh, yes, a little nature and history.

Each island town has its own personality, but they all share a relaxed way of living, clean saltwater air, and a sense that you’ve discovered a place where time might occasionally truly stand still.

Please Note: This is Part 2 of an 8-part series on 50 Places to RV Before You Die

Worth Pondering…

Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the places and moments that take our breath away.
—George Carlin

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What’s to Love about Texas Food

Texans take their food as seriously as they do their football.

Black's Barbecue is Texas' oldest and best major barbecue restaurant continuously owned and operated by the same family. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Black's Barbecue is Texas' oldest and best major barbecue restaurant continuously owned and operated by the same family. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If you slander their vittles, they’re apt to defend their deep-fried passion as though you personally launched another attack on the Alamo.

Necessity has frequently mothered our creations, and early Texans had to make do with meager supplies, which is how they wound up with frugal favorites like chicken-fried steak and fried pies. Such resourcefulness produced foods that bring us endless gratification today.

Many Winter Texans and other visitors to the Lone Star State have the good sense to agree with them—that Texan food is that of the gods.

Little Known & Great Places to Eat

Sure, there are thousands of great places to eat scattered throughout cities and towns all across Texas, and a Main Street Cafe on just about every corner of every berg from Wink to Brownsville. But there are those really special places that qualify as the Best of the Best—the unique and extraordinary—the unusual, and just plain great places to eat. They shouldn’t be missed when traveling down the highways and byways of Texas.

Take a tour of some of our personal favorites and schedule lunch or dinner next time you’re in the neighborhood. These are spots you can’t afford to miss. Bon Appetite!

1. Texas Barbecue

The meat that’s most often used in Texas BBQ is beef. And among the various beef cuts, brisket is hands-down the most popular. There’s something about taking a tough piece of meat like a beef brisket and turning it into a tender and delicious masterpiece.

Another difference is the barbeque sauce. Every Texas barbeque lover knows that there is nothing like the original Texas BBQ sauce. This famous sauce has a sweet and spicy, tomato-based flavor that is thick and delicious.

2. Chicken-fried steak

Born on the cattle-driving trail, this Texas staple was poor folks’ food, as the cowboys ate pretty much what their coosies (chuck-wagon cooks) could scare up. Longhorn was a tough beef, so the coosie pounded it until tender with whatever tools he could find, then dredged it in flour and fried it up in a Dutch oven. Texans by the thousands now savor it on a daily basis.

3. Shrimp

When in the Clear Lake/Galveston area we head for Rose’s in Seabrook for a supply of shrimp. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The shrimp fleet that fishes the Texas Gulf Coast is one of the world’s largest, and there isn’t a place where you can buy this delectable crustacean any fresher or tastier. When in the Clear Lake/Galveston area we head for Rose’s in Seabrook for a supply of this fresh crustacean. Back in our motorhome Dania whips up a fresh feast for dinner while freezing the rest for our future eating enjoyment.

4. Blue Bell Ice Cream

I consider ice cream to be a food group—and there’s no better ice cream available than Blue Bell. In late August 1907, the Brenham Creamery Company opened its doors to sell butter. By 1911, they had put together milk, cream, eggs, and fruit fresh from local farmers and were making a gallon or two of ice cream daily, packing it in a large wooden tub with ice and salt and delivering it by horse and wagon to neighbors. By 1930, Blue Bell Creameries had been born, and today their ice cream is a true Texas favorite.

Made in a multitude of flavors—Pecan Praline ’n Cream, Buttered Pecan, Caramel Sundae Crunch, Spiced Pumpkin Pecan are tops with me. 

5. Pecans

Did someone mention pecans? In the autumn, pecan tree branches become heavy with their bounty of nuts, and the delicious fun begins soon after harvesting. Grown in some 150 Texas counties, Lone Star pecans come in such varieties as Desirable, Western, Pawnee, Cheyenne, Cape Fear, and many more. Enterprising cooks make batches of spiced pecans, pralines, and fudge.

What's your favorite flavor of Blue Bell ice cream? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
What's your favorite flavor of Blue Bell ice cream? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Note: This is the first in a ongoing series on Why I Love Texas Food

Worth Pondering…
You Can’t Spell Texas without H-E-B

No you can’t have Antonio unless you got the San.
And you can’t have the Valley without the Rio Grande.
It ain’t Texas barbecue without the Mesquite smoke,
And Austin’s gotta have its Hook ‘Em Horns and Broken Spoke.

It ain’t the Hill Country if it doesn’t have the hills,
Or Fredericksburg or Dripping Springs, or good ol’ Kerrville.
It ain’t the Texas flag without the Lone Star,
And without blackeyed peas, it ain’t Texas caviar.

There’s so much to love about Texas,
That’s why Texas is home for me.
Can’t find any place on Earth like Texas.
And you can’t spell Texas without H-E-B.

—Written and sung by Jack Ingram

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Pure Michigan Caramel Apple: Official Ice Cream for Michigan State Parks

Kids let their taste buds do the judging

Judges taste-test flavors of ice cream at Hudsonville Ice Cream. (Source: hollandsentinel.com)

Naming the official Pure Michigan ice cream flavor of Michigan state parks? Tasty work if you can get it, and the 2012 Outstanding Outdoor Kids did just that!

Selected by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR), this year’s winners—Lexi Loehfelm, 11, of Ada; Noah Ekdom, 12, of Roscommon; and Jimmy McGrath, 15, of Carleton—let their taste buds do the judging, when they, along with Meijer Corporate Research Chef Ray Sierengowski, picked the official Pure Michigan ice cream flavor of Michigan state parks: Pure Michigan Caramel Apple.

Representatives from the DNR, Hudsonville Ice Cream, Pure Michigan, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD), and Meijer gathered with friends and family of the judges for the event, which took place at the Livonia Meijer store on Middlebelt Road.

While the judges deliberated over the winning flavor, guests took in live Dixieland music, enjoyed free samples of Hudsonville ice cream from the mobile Hudsonville café, and learned about Michigan’s many outdoor recreation options.

Official ice cream: 'Pure Michigan Caramel Apple' (Source: wnem.com)

The DNR joined with Hudsonville Ice Cream and Pure Michigan to launch the “Create a Flavor” contest in January, and interest was immediate. More than 3,000 flavor suggestions were submitted, ranging from Tahquamenon Falls Root Beer Sundae to Hex Hatch Jubilee, each evoking the sights, sounds, and nostalgia of getting away from it all in Michigan’s great outdoors.

The entries were narrowed down to a field of four finalists:

  • Michigan Chocolate Covered Cherries, submitted by Heather Klaver of Grand Rapids
  • Pure Michigan Jubilee, submitted by Gary Kesler of Grandville
  • Shiver MI Timbers, submitted by Carla Reczek of Oak Park
  • Pure Michigan Caramel Apple, submitted by Dawn Dummer of Houghton Lake

In the end, the judges decided that Pure Michigan Caramel Apple was the favorite!

For submitting the winning flavor combination, Houghton Lake’s Dummer has earned sweet bragging rights, along with free Hudsonville ice cream for a year, a one-week stay in a Michigan state park or harbor of her choice, a $1,000 Meijer gift card, and Pure Michigan merchandise.

“I’ve never entered a contest before other than bingo, but I had to do this one! It’s about Michigan and I love Michigan—it’s my home state and I’m proud of it,” said an excited Dummer. “I’m just beside myself right now!”

“This contest has been an exciting partnership with Hudsonville and Pure Michigan, and a creative way to get people thinking about recreation-based tourism,” said DNR Director Rodney Stokes. “Just about everyone has favorite memories of time spent at our state parks. Now they can enjoy an ice cream that sparks those same good feelings and memories.”

Attendees of the Pure Michigan Governor’s Conference on Tourism, March 25-27, will enjoy Pure Michigan Caramel Apple at the conference’s Stars Dinner.

Hudsonville Director of Sales and Marketing Bruce Kratt said the “Create a Flavor” contest marked the start of a campaign that will run throughout the summer with a statewide RV ice cream tour to help promote Recreation 101, the DNR’s popular outreach/education program at Michigan state parks. Meijer will serve as the official retail partner in this campaign, set to begin in early May.

“We will distribute samples of the winning flavor—the official ice cream of Michigan state parks and Pure Michigan—to Meijer and other retail outlets and ice cream parlors throughout Michigan and the Midwest, as well as at stops along our summer ice cream tour,” he explained. “What better way to welcome summer in Michigan!”

Meijer Corporate Research Chef Ray Sierengowski said he was excited to join the three Outstanding Outdoor Kids on the ice cream judging panel.

Dawn Dummer of Houghton Lake (center) is the first place winner in the Pure Michigan “Create a Flavor” ice cream contest. Standing with her are judges (from left) Jimmy McGrath, 15, of Carleton; Noah Ekdom, 12, of Roscommon; and Lexi Loehfelm, 11, of Ada, along with Meijer Corporate Research Chef Ray Sierengowski. (Source: michiganadvantage.org)

“I had so much fun partnering with Hudsonville Ice Cream and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources on this creative event that helps promote our fantastic state,” Sierengowski said. “And what better way to celebrate than with ice cream.”

A key goal of this campaign is to build awareness of the DNR’s Recreation 101 program and Recreation Passport.

“Rec 101” is a series of free, intro-to programs with all the gear and expert instruction included. The RV ice cream tour will also highlight the Recreation Passport—Michigan residents’ $10 ticket to Michigan state parks, recreation areas and boat launches.

The Recreation Passport—which also supports state forest campgrounds, trails, and historic treasures and provides grants to neighborhood parks—can be purchased by Michigan residents at a Secretary of State venue when renewing a vehicle registration. By purchasing the Passport through the Secretary of State, residents can also take advantage of the Passport Perks program that offers discounts at hundreds of local businesses throughout the state.

Related Stories

Worth Pondering…

Life is like an ice-cream cone, you have to lick it one day at a time.
—Charles M. Schulz

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Official Ice Cream for Michigan State Parks

Michigan will be getting an official state park ice cream—and you can help pick the flavor.

Hudsonville Ice Cream to scoop out a Michigan State Park flavor. (Credit: flickr.com/photos/54397539@N06)

If your favorite state park experience was a flavor of ice cream, what would it taste like?
Maybe it will be Seven Layer Fantasy, Captain America, or even Chai Latte.

Hudsonville Creamery and Ice Cream Company is partnering with Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for a cross-promotional marketing blitz starting this month (January).

The push will include a website where anyone can upload outdoors-themed ideas for a new flavor of ice cream.

“Everybody has a great memory that could be put into a flavor of ice cream,” said Bruce Kratt, marketing director for the Holland, Michigan-based ice cream manufacturer. “It might be blueberry picking with grandpa and grandma in Allegan County.”

“It will be the limited edition official flavor of Michigan State Parks,” said Maia Stephens, a DNR recreation programmer working on the project.

“In January, we are going to kick off a flavor recipe and naming contest. People will be able to submit their own ice cream recipes.”

Scoop of Hudsonville Strawberry Chocolate Chunk. (Credit: hudsonvilleicecream.com)

After the public input, Hudsonville will narrow the field of competitors down to four or five flavors, which would be produced at the company’s test kitchen, Kratt said. The winning flavor would be selected from a panel of children and celebrity judges.

The winner would receive a prize, and the winning flavor would be produced as a limited-edition flavor, distributed to ice cream parlors and grocery stores throughout the Great Lakes region, Kratt said.

The contest is just one part of a larger public relations push tied to the Pure Michigan campaign that Hudsonville is planning, Kratt said. Eighty-five percent of the campaign’s events and activities still have not been unveiled.

“It’s unlike anything Hudsonville has done before,” he said.

The ice cream partnership is the latest effort by Michigan State Park to develop promotional and sponsorship agreements with the private sector, a move that began in earnest in 2009.

Stephens said the DNR frequently partners with private companies to promote state parks. “We want to reach out. … We don’t have a lot of money for advertising,” she said. “We’re always looking for opportunities to partner with outside entities.”

Stephens said no money is exchanged in the partnerships. “In the end, the overall winner is Michigan moving forward,” she said.

Details

Hudsonville Creamery and Ice Cream Company

Scoop of Hudsonville Grand Traverse Bay Cherry Fudge. (Credit: hudsonvilleicecream.com)

Hudsonville Ice Cream started when a group of local farmers who were looking for a better way to sell their dairy products banded together to form a new co-op. They chose a location on Chicago Drive in Hudsonville, Michigan, for this new venture, and in 1895 the Hudsonville Creamery was born.

In 1926, the Creamery began churning ice cream during the summer months—producing six flavors—vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, butter pecan, orange pineapple, and tootie fruitie. That same year, the first commercially successful Continuous Process Freezer, developed by Clarence Vogt, was introduced. The continuous freezer would revolutionize the ice cream industry, allowing manufacturers to mass-produce their product for the first time, creating a new demand for what had traditionally been a summertime treat.

Scoop of Hudsonville Mackinac Island Fudge. (Credit: hudsonvilleicecream.com)

Fourteen years later, ice cream had become a staple product for the Hudsonville Creamery, and in 1940 the company began producing the six original flavors of ice cream year-round.

Today, Hudsonville Creamery and Ice Cream Company produces Original ice cream, Creamery Blend ice cream, Heritage Edition ice cream, frozen yogurt, sorbet, and sherbet. There are more than 30 flavors in 1.75 quart containers and still more than 50 flavors available in three gallon containers.

Hudsonville Ice Cream is available throughout Michigan, and selected areas of Ohio, Illinois, and Indiana.

Address: 345 East 48th Street, Suite 200, Holland, MI 49423

Phone: (616) 546-4005

Website: hudsonvilleicecream.com

Worth Pondering…

Life is like an ice-cream cone, you have to lick it one day at a time.
—Charles M. Schulz

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A Sweet Tour: Blue Bell Creamery, TX

Yum—we’ve reached the home of “the little creamery”, Blue Bell Ice Cream, just two miles southeast on Loop Farm Road 577.

"Blue Bell Ice Cream tastes so good because the cows think Brenham is heaven." © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Like other visitors to “the little creamery in Brenham”, we share in the rich history of Blue Bell with a short film, observe the ice cream making process from the time the milk is received to the time the filled ice cream cartons are sent into the blast freezer, and end our tour with a serving or two or three of our “favorite” ice cream flavors.

“In the 1900 era there were hundreds of dairy farmers in this area,” related our tour guide. “Now there are only two or three in the county.” Today the creamery gets its milk from dairy farms within a 200-mile radius.

Blue Bell, still a family company after 104 years, does not sell franchises. That’s because, “We eat all we can and sell the rest,” our tour guide added.

We were led to an observation area that overlooks an array of gleaming steel pipes and containers. We see the pasteurizing tank, the flavoring tanks, and an area where special ingredients like peaches and pecans are added. The finished concoction is the consistency of soft custard when it’s poured into cartons. The cartons go straight into a blast freezer—wind chill factor minus 100 degrees—for eight hours before they get loaded onto trucks.

The company is control-freaky with its distribution. “Making good ice cream is one thing, but then you have to keep it at a constant temperature and ship it properly,” we were told. “We do it all ourselves. We have Blue Bell employees driving Blue Bell trucks that take it to the stores.”

What's your favorite flavor of Blue Bell ice cream? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

They don’t even let stockers fill the freezer cases — Blue Bell employees handle that part, too.

In addition to the tour, visitors can shop in the Blue Bell Country Store for Blue Bell logo items and special gifts with distinct country flavor.

Tours are offered weekdays. From October through February Blue Bell Creameries are on their winter schedule.  If you plan to come on a Wednesday or Friday please call first. Tours are Monday to Friday: 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2 p.m., and 2:30 p.m.  No weekend tours.

Visitors are accommodated on a first-come, first-served basis.

Groups of 15 or more must always have a reservation.

Since tour times change, it is recommended that you phone in advance (800-327-8135).

Admission costs (includes a serving of Blue Bell Ice Cream)

We ended our tour with a generous serving of our “favorite” Blue Bell ice cream flavor. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

General Admission $5.00
Senior Citizens (55+) and Children (6 to 14) $3.00

Tours are also available in other Blue Bell Creamery locations including Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, and Sylacauga, Alabama.

“Blue Bell Ice Cream tastes so good because the cows think Brenham is heaven.”

As I dug into my Pecan Pralines n’ Cream, I was pretty sure those cows were right.

What’s your favorite flavor of Blue Bell ice cream?

Texas Spoken Friendly

Worth Pondering…
Have Yourself a Blue Bell Country Day

If you could take a rainbow,

And a clear blue summer sky
And mix them with a gentle breeze,

In a bowl of pure sunshine;
You’d have the taste of Blue Bell,

Made the good old fashioned way;
Then you’d have a real good start,

On a Blue Bell country day;
Homemade Ice Cream

What a perfect way to say

Have yourself a Blue Bell country day.

—Aaron Barker

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King of Ice Cream: Blue Bell Creamery, TX

Ask expatriate Texans about Blue Bell ice cream, and a certain wistful look will come into their eyes.

Blue Bell ice cream is an icon in Texas. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

“Oh yeah, Blue Bell,” they say. “You’re making me homesick!”

Blue Bell ice cream is an icon in Texas.

Blue Bell has become the best tasting and certainly the most successful ice cream in Texas (and that means the best in the world).

And we’re talking big-time success here! And they did it all out of a little ice cream plant in Brenham, Texas.

How? What makes an exceptionally good thing good?

For the answer I visited “the little creamery” in Brenham: I think I found out.

The Blue Bell Creamery has been churning out some of the best ice cream in the world for over a century. Blue Bell got its start in Brenham back in August 1907, as butter-maker Brenham Creamery Company.

Four years later, they put together milk, cream, eggs, and fruit fresh from local farmers and began making a gallon or two of ice cream daily, packing it in a large wooden tub with ice and salt and delivering it by horse and wagon to neighbors.

What is your favorite Blue Bell flavor? © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

In 1930, the company changed its name to Blue Bell Creameries, after the Texas wildflower that grows throughout much of the state.

Today their ice cream is a true Texas favorite. Made in a multitude of flavors (Pecan Praline ’n Cream, Buttered Pecan, Caramel Sundae Crunch, Chocolate Covered Strawberries, Spiced Pumpkin Pecan, and Moo-llennium Crunch are tops with me), there’re like a hug in a bowl.

Southern Scoops

Known for its frozen interpretations of Southern desserts—Southern Blackberry Cobbler, Banana Pudding, Chocolate Mud Pie, and Southern Hospitality—Blue Bell debuts several new flavors each year, narrowed down from hundreds of suggestions from fans and employees.

Sure, Blue Bell has made a few duds over the years—the Dill Pickles ‘n’ Cream must have prompted a run on grocery stores by pregnant women but Homemade Vanilla, Cookies ‘n Cream, and Dutch Chocolate have earned it a loyal following.

Blue Bell isn’t just the number one ice cream in the Lone Star State. It dominates the market.

A great flavor for the good folks in Kentucky. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

And although Blue Bell is only available in about 26% of the nation’s supermarkets, it ranks as the number three best-selling brand in the United States; also Blue Bell Homemade Vanilla is the best-selling single flavor of ice cream in the entire U.S. Their products are currently sold in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Sales vary according to regional tastes; Black Walnut is a best-seller in the Mississippi River Valley, Pistachio Almond is popular in New Mexico, Arizona, and Florida, and Kentucky Delight is sold only in the Bluegrass State.

Like other folks around Texas and the South, we’re interested in seeing where our favorite ice cream is made.

The sweet story of “the little creamery” in Brenham and the tasting test continues tomorrow…

Texas Spoken Friendly

Worth Pondering…
Blue Bell Ice Cream jingle

I remember our old country home
Clean fresh air and the flowers growing
In the fields, along the path, beside our swimming hole
Momma hollering through the screen
Would you kids like some homemade ice cream?
That was such a simpler time and place
Blue Bell tastes just like the good old days!

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