Bear Pulls Camper from Outhouse

A Winnipeg, Manitoba, man is recovering from his injuries after a black bear dragged him from an outhouse and slashed and bit him repeatedly before a friend intervened and shot and killed the bear.

Credit: tundracomics.com

Gordon Shurvell, 65, was home late Tuesday (May 21) after being treated and released from a hospital in northwestern Ontario.

And he can thank one of his best friends, Daniel Alexander, also of Winnipeg, for possibly saving his life.

The attack happened on Saturday at 6 a.m. at a camping site on Crown land about 36 miles north of Sioux Lookout, Ontario, near Dunbar Lake, the Winnipeg Free Press reported.

Sgt. David Pinchin of OPP Sioux Lookout said Shurvell and his 63-year-old friend were camping in the area when Shurvell went to a wooden outhouse and left its door open.

A black bear then dragged the man by his arm and shoulder, before biting him on the back of his head and neck.

The bear also slashed at his arms, neck, and head. The attack lasted about one minute before Alexander grabbed a gun and shot the animal.

“If you had seen your friend being dragged by a bear, how do you think you would react? Alexander told the Free Press.

“I reacted by instinct … when in a life and death situation you react by instinct. You do what you have to do. I shot the bear.”

Alexander said his friend was bleeding badly, but he managed to stop some of it before they quickly headed to the hospital in Sioux Lookout.

Source: myhaironfire.wordpress.com

“You have to understand bush life: we’re not five minutes from a phone, we don’t have cell phone service,” he said.

Shurvell’s son said it was a terrifying ordeal for his father.

“He was on the john … pulled right from the outhouse,” said Dan Shurvell.

“The bear had him by the shoulder. He’s scratched up pretty bad.”

The man went to hospital for treatment, including a rabies shot, said Pinchin. “He had puncture wounds to the back of his head and neck and slash marks to his arms and back of the head,” Pinchin said.

The officer said police have had a lot of calls about bears in the last couple of weeks, but those animals were non-aggressive.

When asked about the friend who shot and killed the bear, the officer said he would do “the exact same thing.”

“I would fight back and if I had a firearm, I’d kill the bear,” he said.

How to stay safe in bear country

Many people like to enjoy nature closely, by hiking in backcountry and mountainsides. But when you are in bear country, you should be careful and prepared.

Bear Safety Tips

Make lots of noise. Especially important when you are on a trail with restricted visibility, as well as those times when the wind is blowing towards you, meaning that bears will not have the benefit of your scent.

What is most important is for the bear to hear your approach long before you are within its personal space.

Travel in groups. Groups of people tend to make more noise, therefore reducing the chances of a bear encounter. Larger groups also offer the added benefit of appearing much more threatening and thus less likely to attract a bear attack.

Stay alert! Even though you may be making noise, it is still important to always stay alert and on the lookout for bears.

Always carry bear/pepper spray, and make sure that it is quickly accessible. It will be useless if it is buried in your pack. Bear sprays are an effective deterrent in very close range, emergency situations.

The black bear has an acute sense of hearing and smell but has relatively poor eyesight. (Source: oklahomawildlifecontrol.com)

If you see a bear, stay calm and give it plenty of space. Do not startle it; detour slowly, keeping upwind if you can, so it will get your scent and know you are there.

When a bear first detects you, it may stand upright and use all of its senses to determine what and where you are. Once it identifies you it may ignore you, move slowly away, run, or it may charge.

On four legs, a bear may show agitation by swaying its head from side to side, making huffing noises and clacking its teeth.

A charge or retreat may follow. Flattened ears and raised hair on the back of the neck indicate aggressive intent. If a bear runs with a stiff, bouncing gait, it may be a false charge.

Worth Pondering…

I go to nature to be soothed and healed, and to have my senses put in order.

—John Burroughs

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Bear Attack Reported at Arizona Campground

An Arizona woman was injured this morning (May 1) when a bear ripped a hole in the tent where she, her husband, and their dog had been sleeping at Ponderosa Campground in Tonto National Forest, just off Highway 260 about 10 miles east of Payson.

Grizzly bear attacks tent. (Source: Thomas J/travelooce.com)

The attack occurred around 4:30 a.m.

After tearing open the tent, the bear reportedly stuck its head in and clawed at the 74-year-old woman, leaving her with bruises and a laceration on her scalp. She was treated at Payson Regional Medical Center for non-life-threatening injuries and released.

The woman’s husband and dog were not hurt.

A large adult bear had recently been seen hanging around the campsite dumpsters. A wildlife manager with Arizona Game and Fish Department visited Ponderosa Campground yesterday looking for the bear, but it was not found.

A culvert-style trap was set. The wildlife manager talked to the campground host about precautions, and all campers were informed of the bear threat.

The bear returned to the campground sometime during the night. The campground host chased the bear, which retreated. It returned a short time later and attacked the campers in their tent.

Personnel from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services are on scene and working with Game and Fish officers, using dogs to track the bear from the scene of the attack.

“Public safety is our first priority,” said Jim Paxon, information chief with Arizona Game and Fish Department.

“This bear poses a threat to public safety and therefore needs to be lethally removed.”
The Department will conduct a forensic necropsy to confirm that the captured bear is the one responsible for the attack. Disease testing, including rabies, will also be conducted by an outside laboratory.

Officials have evacuated campers and closed Ponderosa Campground. Lower Tonto Creek/Bear Flat/Forest Road 405A have also been closed to entry. An official closure will be put into effect by the Forest Service until the bear danger lessens.

“The bear was probably looking for food, which is scarce this summer because of drought,” Paxon said.

“These campers secured their food in the cab of their truck, and there was no food in the tent. While the campers were with the campground host and medical personnel, the bear came back to the tent a second time, ripped another hole in it, and then went after a pillow that had blood on it from the woman’s wounds.”

Bears are very active during the summer, Paxon added.

“It’s important to stay alert. Bears are attracted to places like dumpsters, trash bins and campsites. Whether folks live here or are just visiting, they need to remember this is bear country. Never leave food out, and never take food into a tent.”

This black bear wants his food food and he is waiting patiently. DO NOT FEED BEARS! (Source: Thomas J/travelooce.com)

Bear attacks on humans are rare. There have only been seven documented cases of bear attacks in Arizona since 1990, including this one.

Bear Safety

It’s important to be informed about bears and what to do when you come into contact with them.

Bears are not tame, gentle, or cuddly; they are unpredictable and potentially dangerous.

Bears are naturally wary of people and are reluctant to come close to humans. However, if you do encounter a bear there are some important things to remember:

  • If the bear is spotted in the distance and has NOT seen you, back away (without running) the way you came while keeping the bear in view; remain calm and avoid direct eye contact
  • If the bear is at close range, back away slowly
  • If you need to move forward, give the bear as much space as possibly
  • If the bear is standing up, it is usually trying to identify you; talk softly so it knows what you are; if its snapping its jaws, lowering its head, flattening its ears, growling, or making ‘woofing’ signs, it is displaying aggression
  • Never come between a bear and its cubs or animal carcass, as the bear will protect them; slowly back away and leave the area the way you came
  • Carry pepper/bear spray when venturing into the wild
  • Report all sightings to Park Staff
What's worse than a grizzly bear attack? When that grizzly bear comes back to attack again. An Alaskan biologist was the recipient of two attacks but survived, and harbors no grudge against the grizzly. (Source: Newscom)

Remember: A Fed Bear is a Dead Bear

Worth Pondering…
Alive, the grizzly is a symbol of freedom and understanding—a sign that man can learn to conserve what is left of the earth. Extinct, it will be another fading testimony to things man should have learned more about but was too preoccupied with himself to notice. In its beleaguered condition, it is above all a symbol of what man is doing to the entire planet. If we can learn from these experiences, and learn rationally, both grizzly and man may have a chance to survive.
—Frank Craighead, Track of the Grizzly, 1979

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Yellowstone Grizzly Victim Identified

A grizzly bear killed a Michigan man whose body was found by hikers last week in Yellowstone National Park, officials said earlier today (August 29).

Grizzly bears are powerful, top-of-the-food-chain predators, yet much of their diet consists of nuts, berries, fruit, leaves, and roots. Bears also eat other animals, from rodents to moose. (Credit: talktocanada.com)

The victim was identified as John Wallace of Chassell, Michigan.

Wallace’s body was discovered along a trail about five miles from the nearest trailhead. Results of an autopsy concluded that he died as a result of traumatic injuries from a bear attack, reported the Associated Press.

It is the second time a visitor to the park has been killed by a bear this year.

Authorities say Wallace likely died Wednesday or Thursday.

He was traveling alone and had pitched a tent in a campground on Wednesday, park officials said. Yellowstone Superintendent Dan Wenk has previously said that the hiker was found with a snack bar in his closed backpack, but that it appears the grizzly did not try to get at the food.

“We know of no witnesses to the event at all,” Wenk said today. “As far as we know, he was in good health and out enjoying the park.”

Grizzly bears have a distinctive muscular shoulder hump, and the claws on the front paws are large, strong and slightly curved. (Credit: edu.pe.ca)

Two trails and a section of the Hayden Valley west of Yellowstone’s Grand Loop Road have been closed to hikers. Park officials asked hikers elsewhere in the park to stay on the trails, to hike in groups of three or more and carry bear spray.

Wallace’s death comes after a female bear attacked and killed a 57-year-old California man in July on the popular Wapiti Lake Trail, several miles away from where the Michigan man’s body was discovered Friday.

The female bear was not killed because officials said the sow was only defending its cubs and had not threatened humans before.

Rangers found grizzly tracks and scat, or bear droppings, near Wallace’s body.

The Mary Mountain Trail is closed from March to June because park managers list it as “high-density grizzly bear habitat.”

Park employees have been searching for the bear around the Mary Mountain Trail northeast of Old Faithful. That’s the area where hikers discovered Wallace’s body on Friday.

Traps have been set to try to capture the bear. Wenk said it would be killed if it can be linked

Bear Safety

The long guard hairs on their backs and shoulders often have white tips and give the bears a grizzled appearance, hence the name grizzly. (Credit: firstpeople.us)

It’s important to be informed about bears and what to do when you come into contact with them.

Bears are not tame, gentle, or cuddly; they are unpredictable and potentially dangerous. The rule about bears is their unpredictability.

Note: A two-part series on Bears and Bear Safety was previously posted.

Worth Pondering…
Alive, the grizzly is a symbol of freedom and understanding—a sign that man can learn to conserve what is left of the earth. Extinct, it will be another fading testimony to things man should have learned more about but was too preoccupied with himself to notice. In its beleaguered condition, it is above all a symbol of what man is doing to the entire planet. If we can learn from these experiences, and learn rationally, both grizzly and man may have a chance to survive.
—Frank Craighead, Track of the Grizzly, 1979

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Five Things You Need to Know Today: August 5

Since I like things to come in fives (and tens), here are five things YOU need to know TODAY!

1. Bear Spray Mandatory on Banff Trail

Let's Go RVing to Jasper National Park, Alberta. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

For the first time in a national park, Parks Canada has mandated that until September 15 hikers on the popular Lake Minnewanka Trail in Banff National Park must travel in a tight group of four or more with at least one person must carry bear spray at all times.

“We want to reduce the potential for another bear attack in that area and we want people to understand just how serious the situation is if they choose to go hiking there,” says Steve Michel, a human-wildlife specialist with mountain park.

The maximum fine for not complying is $25,000 under the National Parks Act.

Earlier this month, a Danish mother and her 13-year-old son came within a few steps of a grizzly sow and her cubs on a trial near the Aylmer Pass

The sow shooed her cubs up a tree and rose on her hind legs; the tourist mom tucked her son behind her, spoke softly and backed away slowly. The two mothers regarded one another briefly, then went in opposite directions with their offspring.

2. Practice Safe Propane Use

A man who tried to fix his gas barbecue next to a campfire suffered serious burns to half his body, according to Didsbury, Alberta, RCMP. The 34-year-old resident of Carstairs had disconnected the propane line as he began his repairs, allowing the flammable gas to leak and spread. Eventually, the propane reached the campfire, igniting the gas.

Let's Go RVing to Mount Washington, New Hampshire. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The fire, which broke out at the Water Valley campground, also fully engulfed his motorhome. The man was taken to Foothills Medical Centre. His injuries were not life-threatening.

3. Fifth Wheel St. Weight Calculator

Dedicated to promoting towing safety, Fifth Wheel St. com  provides an online calculator, printable weighing worksheets, and safety report for 5th wheel and gooseneck trailers. You can weigh your truck and trailer and print your safety report in four easy steps.

Fifth Wheel St. is the brainchild of fulltime RVer, Dave Gray, who saw a need that was not being satisfactorily met for those towing 5th wheel and gooseneck trailers. For the safety of all on the road, it is important for all who are towing heavy trailers to know if their truck is towing safely. If you don’t know your towing weights then you may be an overloaded traveling hazard. The primary reason for Fifth Wheel St. is to emphasize the importance of towing safety by knowing your vehicles’ weight. Fifth Wheel St. simplifies this task.

4. Prepare for an Emergency, Plan & Stay Informed

Disasters have a way of striking without warning. It could be an RV fire or forest fire, severe thunderstorm or tornado, earthquake or tsunamis, hurricane or flooding, extreme heat or cold, or other massive natural disaster. Or it could be an explosion or radiation threat or other man-made disaster.

Are you prepared? Do you have a plan? How will you stay informed?

Most people DO NOT have an emergency plan or resources in place. That can cause confusion, panic, and possibly death.

The U.S. Federal Government’s disaster-preparedness site, Ready.gov has numerous tools to assist you in preparing for the worst.

Let's Go RVing to Santa Fe, New Mexico. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

You can follow the steps for making a disaster kit. It has an emergency plan tool. And it lists resources for staying informed during emergencies.

Although the content is geared toward the general population, businesses, and children, it is easily adaptable to the RV lifestyle.

5. Save on the Price of Fuel

Millions of people plan to hit the road this summer, many traveling in recreational vehicles. Most share one common goal—to save on the price of fuel. Fuel prices are higher than last summer. And it’s likely they’ll go higher during summer.

Every extra cent per gallon adds up. That’s why most RVers are on the lookout for low prices. And you’re not about to drive your condo-on-wheels around to comparison shop.

GasPriceWatch.com was created in April 1999 with the goal of saving the average consumer money. The idea was simple: Give the consumers the information required to help them make cost-saving decisions.

Since site users update the fuel prices, the age of the prices can vary. But, you can filter prices by age. Prices available for Regular, MidGrade, Premium, E-85, Diesel, and BioDiesel.

Worth Pondering…
Do you know why a car’s WINDSHIELD is so large and the rear view mirror is so small? Because our PAST is not as important as our FUTURE. So, look ahead and move on.

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Bare Facts on Bears

Grizzly Bear Kills Hiker in Yellowstone National Park

A grizzly bear is shown in this undated photo. A grizzly bear killed a man hiking in Yellowstone National Park on July 6, 2011. (Credit: Getty Images)

A couple’s hike off South Rim Drive, south of Canyon Village and east of the park’s Grand Loop Road, Wednesday (July 6) morning, turned tragic when they surprised a grizzly bear sow and her cubs. Brian Matayoshi, 57, of Torrance, California, was hiking with his wife, Marylyn, on the Wapiti Lake Trail when they encountered the bears as the couple emerged from a forested area into an open meadow.

The hikers first spotted a bear about 100 yards away and began walking in the other direction, but when they turned to look back they saw the female grizzly charging at them down the trail, according to an account issued by park officials.

The couple began running, but the bear caught up to them and mauled the husband, then approached the wife, who had fallen to the ground nearby.

“The bear bit her daypack, lifting her from the ground and then dropping her,” the park statement said, but the woman remained still and the grizzly lumbered off.

Yellowstone and surrounding areas are home at least 600 grizzlies. Once rare to behold, grizzlies have become an almost routine cause of curious tourists lining up at Yellowstone’s roadsides at the height of summer season.

These tourists have been flooding into Yellowstone in record numbers: 3.6 million last year, up 10 percent from 2009’s 3.3 million, also a record.

It was the park’s first fatal grizzly mauling since 1986, but the third in the Yellowstone region in just over a year amid ever-growing numbers of grizzlies and tourists roaming the same wild landscape of scalding-hot geysers and sweeping mountain vistas.

Officials also issued recommendations for visitors to stay safe from backcountry bears:

  • Stay on designated trails
  • Hike in groups of three or more
  • Make noise in places where a grizzly could be lurking

Bear spray—pressurized hot-pepper residue in a can—can be effective in stopping aggressive bears, they said.

Bears in Canada

Grizzly bears have a distinctive muscular shoulder hump, and the claws on the front paws are large, strong and slightly curved. (Credit: edu.pe.ca)

Canada is home to approximately 380,000 black bears and 26,000 grizzly bears, half of whom are found in British Columbia, according to the Nature Conservacy of Canada.

Avoid Bear Attacks

To avoid unwanted encounters with bears adhere to the following precautions:

  • Obey all park regulations, stay on designated trails, and comply with posted warnings
  • Solo hiking is not advised; the risk of an attack is reduced hiking in a group
  • Always keep children nearby and in sight
  • If possible, keep pets at home. Free-running pets can anger a bear and provoke an attack
  • Make warning noises and loud sounds, e.g., attach bells to hiking boots
  • Pepper/bear spray has been effective in deterring some bear attacks; however, do not rely on it as a substitute for safe practices in bear country

Bear Facts

  • Bears are as fast as racehorses, on the flats, uphill, or downhill
  • Bears aggressively defend their food
  • All female bears defend their cubs; if a female with cubs is surprised at close range or is separated from her cubs, she may attack
  • Bears are strong swimmers
  • Bears have good eyesight and hearing, and an acute sense of smell
  • All black bears and young grizzlies are agile tree climbers; mature grizzlies are poor climbers but they have a reach up to 13 feet
  • All bears will defend a personal space; the extent of this space will vary with each bear and each situation; intrusion into this space is considered a threat and may provoke an attack

Know Your Bears

Are you able to tell the difference between a black bear and a grizzly bear? Color is a poor indicator of bear species as both species can range in color from blond to black.

Black bears are North America's most familiar and common bears. They typically live in forests and are excellent tree climbers, but are also found in mountains and swamps. Despite their name, black bears can be blue-gray or blue-black, brown, cinnamon, or even (very rarely) white. be blue-gray or blue-black, brown, cinnamon, or even (very rarely) white. (Credit: canoe.ca)

Some unique grizzly features include a pronounced shoulder hump, silver or light-tipped guard hairs on their head, and ears that appear smaller and are rounded.

Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis Ord)

Color: Range in color from black to light blonde, mostly medium to dark brown in color; the long hair usually has a lighter tip, hence the grizzled look

Height: Approximately 3½ feet at shoulder; 6-7 feet when erect

Weight: Average 350-500 pounds; larger grizzlies can reach 800 pounds

Shape: Distinct shoulder hump

Face: Depression between the eyes and end of nose; short, round ears

Claws: Very long (2-4 inches)

Habitat: Prefers semi-open spaces; high country in late summer and early fall; valley bottoms late fall and spring

Black Bear (Ursus americanus Pallas)

Color: Range in color from black to light blonde, often with a lighter patch on the chest or at the throat; reddish-colored bears are common in the west

Height: Approximately 2½-3 feet at shoulder; about 5 feet when erect

Weight: Average 110-300 pounds; larger males can reach 600 pounds

Shape: No shoulder hump like the grizzly

Face: A straight line runs between the forehead and end of nose; roundish pointed ears

Claws: Shorter (about 1½ inches)

Habitat: Prefers forested areas with low-growing plants and berry-producing shrubs, small forest openings, streams, and lake edges

What to do if a Bear Attacks

Every encounter is unique and the following are offered as guidelines only to deal with an unpredictable animal and potentially complex situation.

Your response depends on the species and whether the bear is being defensive or offensive.

Bears sometimes bluff their way out of a confrontation by charging then turning away at the last moment. Generally, the response is to do nothing to threaten or further arouse the bear. Remain calm and avoid sudden movements.

Give the bear plenty of room, allowing it to continue its activities undisturbed. Remember that a standing bear is not always a sign of aggression. Many times, bears will stand to get a better view.

While fighting back usually increases the intensity of an attack, it may cause the bear to leave.

Note: This is the second of a two-part series on Bears and Bear Safety.

Previously posted: Are You Bear Aware?

Worth Pondering…
When a pine needle falls in the forest, the eagle sees it; the deer hears it, and the bear smells it.
—old First Nations saying

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Are You Bear Aware?

Wildlife is a huge part of the mountain and wilderness regions of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Arizona, Alaska, Alberta, and British Columbia.

Deep snowpack, more grizzlies

Grizzly bears are powerful, top-of-the-food-chain predators, yet much of their diet consists of nuts, berries, fruit, leaves, and roots. Bears also eat other animals, from rodents to moose. (Credit: talktocanada.com)

Numerous encounters between grizzly bears and humans have been reported this spring, attributed to a growing bear population stuck in the low country as a result of the deep snowpack. High winter snowpack levels mean bears are moving to lower elevations and are likely to stay there longer than in previous winters.

Grizzly bears are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, but their numbers have been growing in recent years, increasing the chance for encounters with humans, according to Chris Servheen, the grizzly bear recovery coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In addition, heavy snowfall this winter has taken longer to melt in cool spring weather.

“You have more bears, and then you have these high snow levels so the bears can’t be in the mountains where they want to be,” Servheen said.

In a nonfatal encounter, two hikers were mauled by a bear in the Gallatin National Forest (Montana) when they came across a young grizzly bear and a sow chasing an elk. The 36-year-old woman tried to climb a tree when the sow bit her in the leg. The man was bitten in the forearm when he tried to fight off the bear. Neither injury was life threatening. They were not carrying pepper spray.

Servheen said it served as a good reminder for people to be bear-aware and make noise and always carry pepper spray while hiking in Bear Country.

Bear Concerns near Yellowstone

The long guard hairs on their backs and shoulders often have white tips and give the bears a grizzled appearance, hence the name grizzly. (Credit: firstpeople.us)

The Gallatin National Forest says grizzly bear experts have recommended banning tent camping in three campgrounds near Yellowstone National Park, including one where a Michigan man was mauled to death last July. The requirement for hard-sided recreational vehicles only is in effect for the Soda Butte, Colter, and Chief Joseph campgrounds just east of Cooke City because bears frequent those areas, reports the Associated Press.

Forest spokeswoman Marna Daley says the requirement is in place this summer while managers consider a long-range strategy. Hard-sided vehicles include those made of metal or strong composite plastic. Truck-box campers that have a 4-foot high hard side, in addition to a raised upper section, are permissible.

Bear Safety

It’s important to be informed about bears and what to do when you come into contact with them.

Bears are not tame, gentle, or cuddly; they are unpredictable and potentially dangerous.

Bears are naturally wary of people and are reluctant to come close to humans. However, if you do encounter a bear there are some important things to remember:

  • If the bear is spotted in the distance and has NOT seen you, back away (without running) the way you came while keeping the bear in view; remain calm and avoid direct eye contact
  • If the bear is at close range, back away slowly
  • If you need to move forward, give the bear as much space as possibly
  • If the bear is standing up, it is usually trying to identify you; talk softly so it knows what you are; if its snapping its jaws, lowering its head, flattening its ears, growling, or making ‘woofing’ signs, it is displaying aggression
  • Never come between a bear and its cubs or animal carcass, as the bear will protect them; slowly back away and leave the area the way you came
  • Carry pepper/bear spray when venturing into the wild
  • Report all sightings to Park Staff

A Fed Bear is a Dead Bear

Black bears typically have black fur over the main part of their body with a tan colored muzzle. (Credit: bearsforever.com)

Don’t be a contributor to food-conditioning.

Wildlife experts say having a bear wreck your campsite is not only bad for you, but potentially deadly for the bear.

Bears that scavenge for food begin to associate food with humans, and become food-conditioned. Food-conditioned bears lose their natural fear of humans and become a threat to park visitors as they roam through the park in search of an easy meal.

There is little or no chance of correcting a food-conditioned bear; Park Rangers are forced to destroy them when they become aggressive towards humans.

Avoiding Dangerous Encounters with Bears

Food-conditioning of bears can be prevented by heeding the following simple precautions:

  • Never feed or approach bears or other wildlife
  • Reduce or eliminate odors that attract bears
  • Store food in air-tight containers in RV or car trunk
  • Keep your campsite clean
  • Never leave cooking utensils, coolers, grease, or dish water lying around the campsite
  • Obey all closures and warnings

The rule about bears is their unpredictability.

Note: This is the first of a two-part series on Bears and Bear Safety.

Worth Pondering…
Alive, the grizzly is a symbol of freedom and understanding—a sign that man can learn to conserve what is left of the earth. Extinct, it will be another fading testimony to things man should have learned more about but was too preoccupied with himself to notice. In its beleaguered condition, it is above all a symbol of what man is doing to the entire planet. If we can learn from these experiences, and learn rationally, both grizzly and man may have a chance to survive.
—Frank Craighead, Track of the Grizzly, 1979

Read More