The Best Places to RV in July

Summer vacation—the memories and anticipation keep you going all year long.

Whether you’re a beach bum, adventure junkie, or devout worshipper of the weekend getaway: yes, there’s a trip for that. Summer opens up a world of possibilities for RV travel—here’s where to go for great weather and greater value.

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Some people spend their entire year planning summer vacations, while others take off for a weekend trip on a whim. Regardless of what type of planner you are, we’ve put together a list of fantastic getaways to fulfill any and all travel itches. International travelers flock to the United States in the summer, and for good reason—just about the entire country is awash in great weather, from typically rainy destinations like Seattle to seasonal beach towns in the northeast.

If you’re one of the lucky few with a nice, long summer break, take advantage of the time off and RV from coast to coast.

And be sure to catch up on all our recommendations for the best places to visit in April, May, and June.

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Admire the grandeur and wonders of the Grand Canyon, a powerful and inspiring landscape that overpowers our senses through its immense size. You won’t find similar mixtures of color and erosional formations anywhere else. The canyon is 277 river miles long, up to 18 miles wide, and about a mile deep, according to the National Park Service. Just about everywhere you look the views are amazing and the sheer size of it can be overwhelming.

Newport, Rhode Island © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Newport, Rhode Island © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Newport, Rhode Island

There are plenty of things to do in Newport but the seaside city really shines brightest during the summer. After all, the million-dollar mansions that Newport is known for were built as warm-weather retreats, for those perfect days spent on yachts and lawns. But even if you don’t have a mansion home to stay in, there are many ways to soak in the culture—at a fraction of the price.

The Cliff Walk, where you can peek into well-manicured backyards, remains free, while some of the mansions charge a small admissions fee. And the who’s who of Newport will be out in spades at two big festivals this month: the Newport Folk Festival and the Newport Jazz Festival.

Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah

At an elevation of over 10,000 feet, Cedar Breaks National Monument looks down into a majestic geologic amphitheater, a three-mile long cirque of eroding limestone, shale, and sandstone. Like a naturally formed coliseum, the Amphitheater plunges 2,000 feet taking your eyes for a colorful ride through arches, towers, hoodoos, and canyons.

The colorful wildflower bloom is generally at its peak during the first two weeks of July, which coincides with the annual Cedar Breaks Wildflower Festival, a wonderful reason to visit the park.

Canadian Rockies, Alberta

Banff National Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Banff National Park, Alberta © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Canadian Rockies stretch 900 miles northwest from the Montana border. The lakes and peaks combined create gob-smacking scenery at any time of the year. But since an RV/car is indispensable for visiting the Rockies, accessing their beauty is easiest in the warmer months, when the highways are clear of ice and snow.

Banff and Jasper are the two most popular destinations for visitors to the Rockies. They are connected by a 140-mile highway that offers unobstructed mountain views on both sides.

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Go underground at Carlsbad Caverns, a magical world of mysterious passageways, colossal rock formations, crystal-clear pools of water, and giant subterranean chambers. Explore a whole new world over 700 feet below the ground made up of 117 known caves. Most of the formations—or speleothems—found inside Carlsbad Cavern today were active and growing during the last ice age when instead of having a desert above the cave, there were pine forests.

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Arizona and Utah

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Arizona and Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Arizona and Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area is a sprawling, remote gorge in northern Arizona and southern Utah. Dozens of side canyons spill into it, sloping creeks and red-walled slots flanked by high cliffs, hoodoos, and arches. Glen Canyon’s 1.25 million acres encompass Lake Powell, Glen Canyon Dam, and Lees Ferry, known for its trout fishing and as the put-in spot for Colorado River raft trips. Lake Powell Resort and Wahweap Marina offer RV camping on the lake, boat tours, and houseboat rentals.

Worth Pondering…
From wonder into wonder, existence opens.

—Lao Tzu

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