Dust Storm Safety. 5 Ways To Survive.

A dust storm usually arrives suddenly in the form of an advancing wall of dust and debris which may be miles long and several thousand feet high.

Dust storms that turn day into night are a hazard to drivers.

A wall of dust enveloped the Phoenix metro area, turning daylight into darkness for more than an hour Monday, July 9, 2018, as a monsoon storm packing thunder and lightning, high winds and sheets of rain grounded flights and damaged property. (Source: CBS News affiliate 3TV/CBS 5)

A wall of dust enveloped the Phoenix metro area, turning daylight into darkness for more than an hour Monday, July 9, 2018, as a monsoon storm packing thunder and lightning, high winds and sheets of rain grounded flights and damaged property. (Source: CBS News affiliate 3TV/CBS 5)

Dust storms can occur with little warning reducing visibility to near zero in seconds.

Dust Storms are among nature’s most violent and unpredictable phenomena. High winds lift dirt particles or, in the case of sandstorms, sand, into the air, unleashing a turbulent, suffocating cloud of particulates and reducing visibility to almost nothing in a matter of seconds.

Nearly all dust storms are capable of causing property damage, injuries, and deaths, and they can occur in any arid or semi-arid climate. No matter where you live, it’s a good idea to know what to do if you see a wall of sand racing toward you.

A massive dust storm moved through the Phoenix area July 25, 2014 evening, knocking out power to more than 10,000 Salt River Power electricity customers and diverting at least one flight bound for Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. (Source: NBC News)

A massive dust storm moved through the Phoenix area July 25, 2014 evening, knocking out power to more than 10,000 Salt River Power electricity customers and diverting at least one flight bound for Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. (Source: NBC News)

Heed Dust Storm Warnings

Dust storms are most likely to occur on hot summer days under certain atmospheric conditions, so meteorologists can frequently predict the possibility of these storms. Tune in to local TV or radio broadcasts before traveling in hot, dry conditions, and consider rerouting or delaying your trip if dust storms are predicted.

Be Prepared

If you are in a storm-prone area, carry a mask designed to filter out small particulates, and bring airtight goggles to protect your eyes. It’s also wise to carry a supply of water in case you are stuck in a storm. Dust storms are usually accompanied by high temperatures, and you can quickly become dehydrated in the dry heat and high winds. Wear or carry clothing that covers your body to protect you from the sandblasting.

A wall of dust can be up to 60 miles wide and over a mile high. Image above over Phoenix, 2012. (Source: Twisted Sifter)

A wall of dust can be up to 60 miles wide and over a mile high. Image above over Phoenix, 2012. (Source: Twisted Sifter)

Outrun the Storm?

If you see a dust storm from some distance, and you are in a vehicle or have access to one, you may be able to outrun it or detour around it. Some dust storms can travel at more than 75 miles per hour, but they frequently travel much slower.

Trying to outrun a storm, however, is not advisable if you have to put yourself at risk by traveling at high speeds. If the storm is catching up with you, it’s best to stop and prepare for it. Once consumed by the storm, your visibility can potentially be reduced to zero in a matter of seconds.

A massive dust storm almost 100-miles-wide swept over the Texas Panhandle April 6, 2016. (Source: USA Today)

A massive dust storm almost 100-miles-wide swept over the Texas Panhandle April 6, 2016. (Source: USA Today)

Pull Aside and Stay Alive

If you’re driving a vehicle and visibility drops to less than 300 feet, pull off the road (exit the freeway if possible), set your parking brake, turn OFF your headlights, and make sure brake lights and turn signals are also off.

If your exterior lights are on, other drivers will use the taillights of the person in front of them as a guide to help navigate the road ahead of them. If you are pulled off the road and are sitting there with your lights on, unbelievably, someone might think they can follow you and run right off the road or even collide with you! Turning your headlights off while stationed off the road, will reduce the possibility of a rear-end collision.

 dust storm reminiscent of those which plagued the southern plains of the United States during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s that struck Lubbock, Texas, October 17, 2011. (Source: Oklahoma Farm Report)

dust storm reminiscent of those which plagued the southern plains of the United States during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s that struck Lubbock, Texas, October 17, 2011. (Source: Oklahoma Farm Report)

If you are NOT able to safely pull off the road, keep your headlights on, turn on your hazard lights, slow down, and proceed with caution, sounding your horn periodically. Use the highway’s centerline to guide you if you can’t see in front of you. Pull over at the nearest safe spot.

Take Cover and Stay Put

Do not attempt to move about in a blinding storm, as you will not be able to see potential hazards in your path.

Roll up the windows and turn off vents that bring outside air in.

Do not enter a dust storm. If you can avoid getting caught in a storm, do not tempt fate.

In Arizona, one to three large dust storms will move into the Phoenix area during a given year. Across the state, more than 100 dust storms have been reported in the past 10 years. Above dust storm blew though Phoenix October 15, 2015. (Source: NBC News)

In Arizona, one to three large dust storms will move into the Phoenix area during a given year. Across the state, more than 100 dust storms have been reported in the past 10 years. Above dust storm blew though Phoenix October 15, 2015. (Source: NBC News)

Please Note: This is Part 1 of a 2-part series on Surviving Dust Storms

Part 2: Pull Aside, Stay Alive. What Comes Next?

Worth Pondering…

Houses were shut tight, and cloth wedged around doors and windows, but the dust came in so thinly that it could not be seen in the air, and it settled like pollen on the chairs and tables, on the dishes.”
—John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

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