5 Must-See Spots in North America

From saguaros and hoodoos to fern-covered canyons and massive glaciers, we have explored some of the most incredible sights the U.S. and Canada have to offer.

Towing a car offers us the freedom to venture most anywhere while our motorhome remains at the RV park or campground of our choosing.

Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

We’ve explored everything from national parks and state and provincial park in the United States and Canada to historic sites, scenic byways, and food destinations. From emerald-colored lakes and strange rock formations to sentinels in the desert and valleys blanketed in golden trees, here are five must-see North American destinations you won’t want to miss when taking your own journey.

Mount Robson — British Columbia

For the best views of Mount Robson drive east on Yellowhead Highway 16 toward Jasper National Park. The towering mountain, which is the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies, is often shrouded in clouds. You may have to wait for hours to see its peak emerge as the surrounding clouds dissipate.

Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The mountain sits within the Mount Robson Provincial Park, which is the second oldest provincial park in British Columbia, and is home to everything from glaciers and lakes to waterfalls, canyons, and limestone caves. Camping sites are available.

Moki Dugway — Utah

Mokee Dugway, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Mokee Dugway, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Moki Dugway, located at the western end of the Valley of the Gods (known for its buttes and towering pinnacles), is a graded dirt switchback road carved into the edge of Cedar Mesa.

The unpaved and steep roads can be dangerous and should be approached with caution, but many brave the drive for the end result. From the top, visitors are treated to sweeping views over the Valley of the Gods and Monument Valley in the distance. You get an amazing 180-degree view of the entire valley that’s filled with red and orange rock formations with the colors intensifying as the sun sinks lower in the sky.

Saguaro National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Saguaro National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Saguaro National Park — Arizona

Saguaro National Park is outside of Tucson, a small part of the vast Sonoran Desert, which stretches from Mexico into southern Arizona and California. The park is named after the saguaro cactus, because the Sonoran Desert is the only place where you can find them. It’s such a strange feeling to walk among such plants. They’re treelike: alternately majestic and comical looking, almost animated in their stances.

Saguaro is one of the places where my love of and discovery of The West began.

Saguaro National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Saguaro National Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The saguaro are considered the nation’s largest cacti and are only found in select parts of the U.S., making the park one of few locations you can take in their size. Some of the cacti rise as high as 50 feet.

Best explored from late autumn to early spring as summer temperatures routinely exceed 100 degrees.

Queen’s Garden — Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

The Queens Garden Trail beginning at Sunrise Point, descending 320 feet, is considered the least difficult trail entering the canyon from the rim. Traveling this trail you will see many hoodoos (tall and slender rock spires that jut out from the bottom of arid basins), representative of garden like features. Using your imagination you may be able to see Queen Victoria at the end of a short spur trail, overseeing the garden before her.

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

When you walk through, it feels like you’re in a giant castle as you look up and see all these rock formations rise around you.

Best explored from late spring to early autumn as freezing temperatures and snow come early and stay late at this high elevation park (rim elevation: 8,000 feet).

Arches National Park — Utah

Arches National Park encompasses a collection of red rocks that make visitors feel more like they’re on Mars than near the northern edge of Moab.

Arches National Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Arches National Park, Utah © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Sandstone monuments like Delicate Arch and Balanced Rock scatter the park, which spans nearly 77,000 acres. The otherworldly atmosphere draws avid photographers in droves, while the wonky landscapes attract adventurous hikers and rock climbers. Note that Arches National Park is in a high desert region, meaning the temperature variance between day and night can be 40 degrees.

Worth Pondering…

I think, therefore I am.

I listen, therefore I know.

I travel to discover, therefore I grow.

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