Getting Back to Nature

As a culture we rely more than ever on electronics to make our lives easier, although the opposite is typically true.

By spending time “unplugged” and getting back to nature with only yourself, family, or close friends, your mind—and eyes—will be more open to the world around you.

Camping at Meaher State Park. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping at Meaher State Park. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Fortunately, state parks have numerous campgrounds for you to take extended forays from the grinds of everyday life while leaving behind the chain of electronics.

Camping will enlighten your awareness, has been proven to reduce stress, and will generally place an aura of ease around you.

Need a break? Spend a few days or longer at a state parks and recharge.

Meaher State Park, Alabama

Located in the wetlands of Mobile Bay, Meaher State Park is a scenic 1,327-acre park offering facilities for both camping and day-use. A 300-foot fishing pier with a 200-foot “T” and boat ramp make the park an excellent location for fishing. A boat ramp is also available.

A self-guided walk on two nature trails offers an up-close view of the beautiful Mobile Delta.

Meaher State Park offers 56 modern campsites with 50/30/20-amp electric service, water, and sewer connections. There are also 10 improved tent sites with water and 20-amp electric service.

Camping at Custer State Park. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping at Custer State Park. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Custer State Park, South Dakota

Custer State Park in the beautiful Black Hills is full of lush forests, quiet and serene meadows, and majestic mountains. Four mountain lakes, along with several streams, offer many water recreation and fishing opportunities.

Custer State Park campgrounds offer a variety of scenic sites. Set up camp along a flowing stream, in the midst of pine forest, or near a mountain lake. Each campsite has a gravel or paved camping pad, a fire grate, and picnic table. Electric hookups are available in most campgrounds.

Mount Mitchell State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Mount Mitchell State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Mount Mitchell State Park, North Carolina

The drive up Mount Mitchell is a slow string of twists and curves that gradually climb up, up, up. When you reach the visitor center, two more miles will take you to the summit parking lot. A quarter-mile paved walkway leads to the summit observation platform. Up there, your shoulders drop. Tension and stress disappear in the vast 360-degree views.

A nine-site tent campground is open in warm-weather months, and backpacking opportunities abound. A concession area and a full-service restaurant serve visitors from May to October.

Shenandoah River State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Shenandoah River State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Shenandoah River State Park, Virginia

Named for the river it boarders, Shenandoah River State Park is a peaceful and serene park. With over 5 miles of river front and nestled between the Blue Ridge Mountains, the park is truly a gem. The rolling, mountainous land features steep slopes and is mostly wooded.

A large riverside picnic area, picnic shelters, multi-use trails, river access, and a car-top boat launch make this a popular destination for families, anglers, and canoeists. With miles of trails and ziplines, the park has plenty of options for hiking and biking. Riverfront tent campsites, a campground with water and electric sites, cabins, and camping cabins are available.

Vogel State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Vogel State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Vogel State Park, Georgia

Vogel State Park is in the heart of north Georgia Blue Ridge Mountains, 11 miles south of Blairsville. At 2,500 feet elevation Vogel State Park maintains a cool evening temperature even in the dog days of summer. The park provide a range of overnight accommodations including 56 campsites with electric service suitable for RVs up to 40 feet in length, 22 tent/pop-up campsites, 14 tent-only walk-in campsites, and 34 cottages.

A lake for swimming and boating, and miles of hiking trails adjacent to the famous Appalachian Trail offer something for everyone. The park’s 22-acre lake is open to non-motorized boats, and during summer, visitors can cool off at the mountain-view beach.

Dead Horse Point State Park, Utah

Camping at Dead Horse Point State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping at Dead Horse Point State Park © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The parking lot at Dead Horse Point State Park, 30 miles from Moab, is a few steps from one of the most dramatic vistas in the desert Southwest—looking down 1,000 feet to the top of Dead Horse Mesa, which itself towers a thousand feet above the Colorado River.

Park facilities include a visitor center, picnic area, and a 21-unit campground. Water is limited. The Park has 10 miles of hiking trails following the canyon rim around the park.

Worth Pondering…

Our wish to you is this: drive a little slower, take the back roads sometimes, and stay a little longer. Enjoy, learn, relax, and then…plan your next camping trip.

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