The Best Places To RV in March

Spring break season is just starting, but if you plan well, it’s possible to find a great spot with great weather—and no crushing crowds.

March is when the cold starts to let up and much of the country finally gets signs of warmer weather. But if you start planning a trip for the summer months, you’ll hit high season for most destinations. Instead, seek out places where you can RV now—an ideal combination of warm weather and no crowds.

Along the Creole Nature Trail near Lake Charles, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Along the Creole Nature Trail near Lake Charles, Louisiana © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

If you’re looking for a quick jaunt, there are tons of exciting happenings in Cajun Country (Louisiana), Mesa (Arizona), and San Antonio (Texas). All three locales have exciting food scenes, but they each have March-specific attractions as well.

No matter where your RV travels take you—and whether you want to avoid spring break destinations or embrace them—there are plenty of places to go that are warm. What are you waiting for?

And be sure to catch up on all our recommendations for the best places to visit in January and February.

Lake Charles, Louisiana

Adventures in culture, food, and music await in Cajun Country where life is on the spicy side.

With Louisiana flavors such as boudin, crackling, crawfish, gumbo, jambalaya, and hot sauce, Acadiana has all the makings for a taste-tempting trip.

But there is more to the Cajun appeal than just the food. Between bites of their tasty cuisine, boredom is never a problem. Nature experiences are abundant on the Creole Nature Trail, an All-American Road.

Usery Mountain Regional Park overlooking Mesa. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Usery Mountain Regional Park overlooking Mesa. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Mesa, Arizona

The city’s biggest attraction this time of year is Spring Training, where 15 Major League Baseball teams gather in Mesa and the surrounding areas to play one another before the season officially starts. Many RV parks get in on the action as well. The area also has wonderful hikes and scenic drives, so there’s no lack of entertainment even if you’re not a baseball buff.

Galveston, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Galveston, Texas © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Galveston, Texas

Galveston sits on a barrier island two miles offshore surrounded by 32 miles of sandy beaches, numerous attractions, and one of the largest and best-preserved concentrations of Victorian architecture in the U.S.

Must-see historical attractions include the 1859 Ashton Villa, 1861 Custom House, 1885 Moody Mansion, 1892 Bishop’s Palace, 1877 Tall Ship Elissa, and Strand Historic District. The first of

Death Valley National Park, California

Dante’s View, Death Valley National Park. © Rex Vogel, all rights

Dante’s View, Death Valley National Park. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Death Valley National Park sits in a low depression east of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Though Death Valley measures in at just 12 miles wide, the expanse covers 130 miles in length. Telescope Peak marks the highest elevation in the park at 11,039 feet, while the lowest spot, Badwater, is down at 282 feet below sea level, the fifth lowest point in the world.

Dauphin Island, Alabama

Dauphin Island, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Dauphin Island, Alabama © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Located at the mouth of Mobile Bay, Dauphin Island is dotted with  historic sites including Fort Gaines, a major landmark of the Civil War. The island offers beautiful beaches, pristine environments, coastal amenities, and a rich history.

Ravaged by centuries of hurricanes and war, Dauphin Island has emerged as one of the most beautiful and peaceful settings on the Gulf Coast. The French landed on Dauphin Island in 1699, giving the island its name, after a member of French royalty, “Dauphine.” The island passed through British and Spanish hands before becoming part of the United States.

Patagonia, Arizona

Patagonia State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Patagonia State Park, Arizona © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

At an elevation of over 4,000 feet between the Santa Rita and Patagonia mountains, lies the small town of Patagonia. At first glance Patagonia is a town that you pass through on the way to somewhere else. However, a second glance reveals a growing community of artists and crafts people that have decided that this is a very desirable area to live and work.

For nature lovers, this area is in itself a delight. Hiking, bicycling, horseback riding, and water activities are popular outdoor activities. And Patagonia is an internationally renowned “birdwatching” destination.

Worth Pondering…
If you don’t know where you are going, any road will lead you there.

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