Small Towns You Should Visit on Your Next Road Trip

Big cities are great to visit if you’re looking for lots of stuff to see and do in a short period of time. No shame in the big city game.

But maybe you have lots of time available, you’re retired, between jobs, or you’re self-employed—and you’re able to set a few weeks or more aside for an all-American road trip (there’s truly nothing in the world like it—especially in an RV).

A sweet, historic brand iconic to the downtown shopping area, Wilbur Chocolate has a new location – right across the street from the former store. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A sweet, historic brand iconic to the downtown shopping area, Wilbur Chocolate has a new location – right across the street from the former store. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

First, congratulations! You’re about to embark on the adventure of a lifetime. But now, where to go?

We’ve explored America by RV and found these six cool small-town gems you’re sure to enjoy.

Lititz, Pennsylvania

You couldn’t ask for a more beautiful location, in rural Lancaster County, with its rolling farmland and traditional Amish communities. Savor 18th-century history in Litilz. It’s got America’s first commercial pretzel bakery, a historical foundation and museum, a seven-acre park, a train station, the Wilbur Chocolate Museum and Factory Store, and a wolf sanctuary.

Take a dip into colonial-era history at the Lititz Historical Foundation, the Johannes Mueller House, the Moravian Church, and a cemetery the locals refer to as God’s Acre. Stroll through Lititz Springs Park, right in the middle of downtown, to take in the scenery and feed the ducks.

Many of Beaufort’s historic homes also offer tours. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Many of Beaufort’s historic homes also offer tours. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Beaufort, South Carolina

Hauntingly beautiful is perhaps the best way to describe the South Carolina Lowcountry. Charming homes and churches grace this old town on Port Royal Island. Picturesque Beaufort charms visitors with historic Southern mansions, tree-lined boulevards, and an ocean-side location. Beaufort has everything you would hope for in a small Southern town: antebellum mansions, Spanish-moss-covered trees, and a picturesque seaside location on Port Royal Island.

The largely historic business district is located on the east side of the Coosa River. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The largely historic business district is located on the east side of the Coosa River. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Wetumpka, Alabama

Known as “The City of Natural Beauty,” Wetumpka, is a Creek Indian word meaning “rumbling waters,” describing the sound of the nearby Coosa River. The Coosa River flows through the middle of the city, dividing the historic business district from its residential counterpart.

Bibb Graves Bridge, a focal point of the City was built in 1937. Designed by state bridge engineer Edward Houk and named after Governor Bibb Graves, it is reputed to be one of two bridges in Alabama to be suspended by reinforced concrete.

Adairsville, Georgia

Adairsville is Georgia’s first National Historic Register City. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Adairsville is Georgia’s first National Historic Register City. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

A visit to this Norman Rockwell kind of town is a must for anyone who loves history, antiquing, and good food. Adairsville, nestled in the Oothcalooga Valley, was the first Georgia town to be listed in its entirety on the National Register of Historic Places (December 1987). More than 130 homes and businesses are designated as historic properties.

Many of the pre-Civil War homes and churches stand alongside fine Victorian examples in the 170-acre historic district. Explore tree-lined streets and marvel at the interesting history shared by residents in the Adairsville Visitor’s Guide brochure.

The Kentucky Artisan Center, only 2.5 miles from downtown Berea, showcases innovative works in four to five special gallery exhibitions each year. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Kentucky Artisan Center, only 2.5 miles from downtown Berea, showcases innovative works in four to five special gallery exhibitions each year. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Berea, Kentucky

In Berea you can celebrate Kentucky crafts by visiting dozens of artist’s studios, galleries, and stores. The Folk Arts and Crafts Capital of Kentucky, Berea is ranked among the top art communities in the U. S. Nestled between the Bluegrass region and the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains, Berea offers visitors over 40 arts and crafts shops featuring everything from handmade dulcimers and homemade chocolate to jewelry stores, art galleries, quilt-makers, and even glassblowing studios.

Sculptures of mythical beasts, vibrantly painted open hands, and historic architecture are a few of the delights as one wanders the town and college. Berea is a growing, unique, and creative community—a place where it can indeed be said that the—Arts are Alive!

Historic Downtown Mount Airy “Mayberry” © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Historic Downtown Mount Airy “Mayberry” © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Mount Airy, North Carolina

Mount Airy, the birthplace of Andy Griffith, is really just like any of hundreds of small towns throughout the South, it just happens to have been ingrained into our collective memory as “Mayberry” and they really run with it.

Fans of The Andy Griffith Show step back to a simpler time when they visit Mount Airy.

Ahhhhh―life seemed so simple back then….small town, friendly folk, slower paced life, home cooking, and fresh baked pies. You’ll leave with a really good feeling, like you’ve gone back in time to the ‘good ole days’.

Worth Pondering…

This is not another place.

It is THE place.

—Charles Bowden

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