ESCAPE Homes Introduces ESCAPE One RV Home

For over two decades, ESCAPE has been producing tiny homes that fit into the framework of what a tiny house should be while still being completely unique.

ESCAPE Homes, one of the country’s largest builders of travel-ready tiny RV homes, has introduced its newest organic design in the new ESCAPE One.

The expansive first floor area underneath the loft can translate into a number of uses

The expansive first floor area underneath the loft can translate into a number of uses. Image courtesy Escape Homes

Highlighted by an exterior of Shou Sugi Ban (the Japanese technique of charred or burnt siding that lasts 80-100 years), the 276-square-foot tiny home-on-wheels features a huge sleeping loft and a raw, zen-like interior that is best described by the Japanese concept of “Ma” (the space between or negative space).

A full light 36-inch glass entry door and large picture window draws the outdoors in.

The pine kitchen features space-saving elements of an under-counter refrigerator, hideaway sink and stove, and upper shelving.

The expansive first floor area underneath the loft can translate into a number of uses for its owner including an office, living room, bedroom, library, or multi-use room.

large picture window draws the outdoors in.

The large picture window draws the outdoors in. Image courtesy Escape Homes

A built-in closet and pull-out drawers are incorporated into the stairs that lead to a second floor with a 5-foot ceiling and a panorama of windows that open.

The bathroom features a 36-inch tub/shower, designer sink, and toilet.

Other unit features and options include flat screen TV with Blu-ray, stone counter top, USB outlets, exterior shower, cellular shades, and queen, king, or twin beds.

ESCAPE One can sleep up to four people, is easily transported via its own trailer, and is crafted with high-efficiency insulation and climate control options that allow it to withstand extreme heat or cold.

Power usage is minimal and water, power, and utility hook-up takes just minutes, enabling it to travel with the whim of its owner.

The zen-like interior is best described by the Japanese concept of “Ma” (the space between or negative space).

The zen-like interior is best described by the Japanese concept of “Ma” (the space between or negative space). Image courtesy Escape Homes

Climate control options include high efficiency split system A/C with heat pump and LP furnace with thermostat. Baseboard heat included. Solar power and off-grid features available.

The solar power system features 500w or more in solar panel power, a pure sine wave inverter/battery charger, and up to 100Ah in solar battery storage. You can also upgrade to a 300 Ah of battery storage.

Although built like a cottage, ESCAPE One requires no foundation and is not subject to property tax.

ESCAPE One Fact Sheet

Length: 25 feet (30 feet including hitch)

Width: 8.5 feet

The company’s designs have been widely recognized for their aesthetics and use of space.

The company’s designs have been widely recognized for their aesthetics and use of space. Image courtesy Escape Homes

Height: 13 feet 6 inches

RVIA certified travel trailer

Size: 276 square feet including second floor loft

Weight: 8,500 pounds (exact weight depends on options)

Utility Hook-ups: Standard RV hook-ups including 30-amp electric plug, 3/4-inch water connection, and 3-inch quick couple septic connection; optional water tanks available

Insulation: Closed cell foam using recycled products, 7.4 R value per inch; average R values R30

Cost: Introductory MSRP $49,800 with standard items

ESCAPE Homes are available across the U.S. from New York’s Hudson Valley to California’s Sonoma Valley and North Carolina’s Smoky Mountains, from Wisconsin to Texas and Oregon to Virginia.

ESCAPE One floor plan. Image courtesy Escape Homes

ESCAPE One floor plan. Image courtesy Escape Homes

The company’s designs have been widely recognized for their aesthetics and use of space. “The Today Show” calls them “stunning” and Forbes says they’re “the world’s most beautiful tiny house.”

Worth Pondering…

In the end, we only conserve what we love.

We only love what we understand.

We will understand what we are taught.

—Baba Dioum, Sengalese poet

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