Climate a Key Factor in Planning an RV Camping Trip

RV camping styles and activities vary with location and climate.

High deserts are known for causing dehydration, sunburn, sunstroke, and dry skin. Drink plenty of water and apply sunscreen. Pictured above Arches National Park.

High deserts are known for causing dehydration, sunburn, sunstroke, and dry skin. Drink plenty of water and apply sunscreen. Pictured above Arches National Park. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Climate is a key factor in the planning and enjoyment of a camping trip. Research the location to be aware of the type of climate and weather you’re likely to experience. Always be prepared for what mother nature may throw at you, especially if you are camping in a season when climate can adversely affect campers.

Desert Camping

Desert camping can be a unique and rewarding experience. The stark beauty of red rock mesas and mysterious hoodoos in the Southwest is enchanting. But the harsh climate and terrain that defines a desert requires certain precautions and special considerations especially during the summer months.

Drink large amounts of water. By the time you feel thirsty, you’re already dehydrated. Arid climates require one gallon of water, per person, per day—minimum. Hiking in temperatures over 100 degrees in strenuous conditions may need up to four gallons a day.

Sun and heat are related factors to watch. Wear sunscreen, and reapply often. Sun-glasses and a wide-brimmed hat such as the lightweight and comfortable Tilley hat are advisable, as is light-weight clothes that cover exposed skin.

Nestled amongst the peaks of the Canadian Rockies, Banff is known as a traveler’s mecca for good reason. Whether by car, bicycle, hiking boots, skis, snowshoes or canoe, in Banff National

Nestled amongst the peaks of the Canadian Rockies, Banff is known as a traveler’s mecca for good reason. Respect the fact that mountain weather can change quickly and it can be severe. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

The Southwest abounds with places to camp: national parks, state parks, and county parks; national forests; and private Good Sam RV parks. You can camp year-round, and see everything from petroglyphs to ghost towns, white-water rivers to wind-scoured cliffs.

Stay safe in the sun: Slather on the sunscreen, and wear a hat and sunglasses to keep the sun out. Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration, too.

Camping in the Mountains

Campers who are physiologically used to living close to sea level can experience noticeable effects from high altitudes. Additionally weather conditions in the mountains are often unpredictable. Respect the fact that mountain weather can change quickly and it can be severe.

The air is dryer and sunlight tends to be more intense in mountainous areas—especially the Rockies. These areas are known for causing sunburn and dry skin, even in the winter.

Regardless of the season apply sunscreen. Use it regularly and generously on sensitive areas every day, especially your face and neck.

By taking these simple measures, you can help to ensure that your trip to the mountainous outdoors is the experience of a lifetime.

Storm Watching in the Pacific Northwest

November through February is peak storm season along the Pacific coastline of the northwest United States. As the raw power and energy of the winter storms meet the coastlines storm enthusiasts are captivated as twenty to thirty foot waves pound against the beach heads and steep cliffs. The inspiring display of nature’s power captivates the imagination and energizes the spirit.

One of the best places to view the storms is along the Oregon Coast. With its many lookout points along the shoreline, it’s easy to see why it’s such a hotspot for storm watching—especially for RVers on the move.

Winter Camping

Ice Fish Early & Stay Late in the All Season Sport Trailer

Ice Fish Early & Stay Late in the All Season Sport Trailer

While RV camping is generally considered fair-weather recreation, it doesn’t necessarily have to be. There are numerous ways to enjoy life on the road during the wintertime months, provided that you plan ahead.

Planning a trip in the winter means spending considerable time researching areas and conditions to determine where, when, and how the trip will work. It takes proper trip planning, experience, and the right equipment to travel safely in the winter environment.

Winter camping can offer campers and hikers a wonderful experience. In a tranquil world of white, you can enjoy down-hill and cross-country skiing, skating, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, and ice fishing. Several RV manufacturers offer travel trailers designed specifically for ice fishing.

It is a winter RV wonderland out there, just waiting for you to explore. Best of all you are camping with all the toasty comforts of home. Where better to sip on apple cider and kick up your winter heels?

Plan ahead for the season and the climate for your intended location and you’ll find your trip that much more enjoyable.

Worth Pondering…

There aren’t four seasons a year in the mountains; there are forty seasons a day up there in those divine altitudes!

—Mehmet Muratildan

This entry was posted in Camping, Road Trips, RV Tips and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply