Top 3 Destinations in Eastern Canada

From sea to sea, Canada is a land filled with fascinating places and amazing destinations for the RV traveler.

But, where to travel? There are so many reasons to love Eastern Canada.

Niagara Falls (Ontario)

A must-do when you visit the Falls, the Maid of the Mist is a 20 minute ride on a double-decker boat that takes you as close up to Niagara Falls as you can get without swimming.

A must-do when you visit the Falls, the Maid of the Mist is a 20 minute ride on a double-decker boat that takes you as close up to Niagara Falls as you can get without swimming. (Source: APT)

Niagara Falls, Ontario, is home to Horseshoe Falls, the most powerful waterfall in North America and possibly the best-known in the world.

A must-do when you visit the Falls, the Maid of the Mist is a 20 minute ride on a double-decker boat that takes you as close up to Niagara Falls as you can get without swimming. The boat stops and lingers at the foot of the Falls, 170 feet below the brink. Be prepared to get wet; disposable rain ponchos come with admission.

A trip to Niagara wouldn’t be complete without spending time on Clifton Hill, the entertainment hub of the Niagara area, with casinos, shops, a plethora of restaurants, and lots of kid fun. Ride the Niagara SkyWheel, visit Ripley’s Believe It or Not, or play mini golf. And there’s the Whirlpool Aerocar, IMAX movie theatre, and leisurely country drives to Niagara-on-the-Lake, vineyards and world-class golf courses, cycling and hiking trails.

Québec City (Québec)

Québec City holds both European charm and sophistication alongside its unmistakable French Canadian character.

Québec City holds both European charm and sophistication alongside its unmistakable French Canadian character. (Source: savvysugar.com)

Québec City attracts more than 4.5 million visitors a year, and for good reason. This fascinating city offers an experience unlike any other in North America. Québec City’s Old Town itself is a work of art: Cobblestone walkways, well-preserved 17th century architecture, café culture, and the oldest walled city in North America—all of which is an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Home to the annual Festival d’été international de Québec (Québec Summer Festival), Québec City holds both European charm and sophistication alongside its unmistakable French Canadian character. It also bears the distinction of being the place where Wolfe defeated Montcalm on the Plains of Abraham, securing Canada for the British Empire.

Home to the iconic Chateau Frontenac, poutine, the clip-clopping of horse-drawn carriages on cobblestone streets, as well as the New France Festival (August 6-10, 2014) and, of course, the world-famous Winter Carnival (January 30 to February 15, 2015), there’s always plenty to do, see, and eat in the capital of La Belle Province.

Getting around Old Town, the part that the majority of tourists visit, is best done on foot. Streets are narrow and crowded not to mention parking is expensive and at a premium.

Much of the pleasure derived from a visit to Québec City comes from merely wandering the old, cobblestone streets of Lower Town and drinking in the history, so much of which is evident in the city’s architecture.

Other places to visit include Chemin du Roy, Petit-Champlain District & Place-Royale, Musée de la civilisation, Battlefields Park (Plains of Abraham), the Citadelle, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, St. Lawrence River and Vieux-Port de Québec, Wendake, Parliament Hill, Île d’Orléans, Montmorency Falls Park, and the Shrine of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré near Mont Sainte-Anne.

All your senses agree: You’re in France. But they’re wrong: You’re in Québec.

Gros Morne National Park (Newfoundland)

A landscape like no other, Gros Morne National Park is an area of great natural beauty with a rich variety of scenery, wildlife, and recreational activities.

A landscape like no other, Gros Morne National Park is an area of great natural beauty with a rich variety of scenery, wildlife, and recreational activities. (Source: triporati.com)

The second largest National Park in Atlantic Canada, Gros Morne National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site stretching across 697 square miles on the coast of western Newfoundland as part of the Long Range Mountains.

Gros Morne National Park is dominated by two distinctly different landscapes, a coastal lowland bordering the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the alpine plateau of the towering Long Range Mountains.

A landscape like no other, the park is an area of great natural beauty with a rich variety of scenery, wildlife, and recreational activities. Visitors can hike through wild, uninhabited mountains and camp by the sea.

Boat tours bring visitors under the towering cliffs of a freshwater fjord carved out by glaciers. Waterfalls, marine inlets, sea stacks, sandy beaches, and colorful nearby fishing villages complete the phenomenal natural and cultural surroundings of Gros Morne.

Beyond its awe-inspiring scenic beauty, Gros Morne National Park is internationally acclaimed for its unique combination of geologic features, an area where the earth’s mantle is exposed, clearly displaying the process of continental drift. The rocks of the area describe eons of geologic turmoil when old oceans disappeared, new ones were created, and continents took shape. The rocks in Gros Morne have contributed greatly to our understanding of plate tectonics.

Worth Pondering…

Canadians have been so busy explaining to the Americans that we aren’t British, and to the British that we aren’t Americans that we haven’t had time to become Canadians.
—Helen Gordon McPherson

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