Living & Working in an RV

As RVers seek ways to enjoy their lifestyle many have turned to working while traveling as a way to support their lifestyle and as a means to supplement their pensions.

Work-campers are typically employed by RV parks and destination resorts. Pictured above is Coastal Georgia RV Resort near Brunswick and the Golden Isles. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Work-campers are typically employed by RV parks and destination resorts. Pictured above is Coastal Georgia RV Resort near Brunswick and the Golden Isles. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

There are many ways for RVers to use their skills and talents to earn income while living in an RV.

For RVers that love recreational activities and enjoy interacting with other people, work-camping offers numerous opportunities for supplementing their income.

Being a work-camper is not just a job, it’s a lifestyle, one that is actively pursued by more than 80,000 RVers throughout the U.S. and Canada.

RVers who work while traveling offset the cost of the RV lifestyle by exchanging their knowledge, skills, and labor for a free camping site and occasional minimum wage pay. Work-campers are typically employed by RV parks and destination resorts, state and national parks, wildlife refuges and preserves, US Forest Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers facilities, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and US Fish and Wildlife Service. Opportunities for work-camping are also available at amusement and theme parks, museums and art galleries, and other outdoor recreation facilities and attractions.

Commercial companies and other businesses have found work campers to be a great resource to help with busy periods during the year.

With the advancement in mobile technology, it has become easier to work from a mobile office.

With the advancement in mobile technology, it has become easier to work from a mobile office.

Many RVers who work while traveling are on the road full-time, moving from place to place. Others stay long-term in one location or return to the same RV Park or public campground year after year.

Some camp hosts share responsibility for large RV parks, while others host smaller campgrounds alone. Responsibilities may include greeting visitors, office duties, collecting fees, equipment rental, organizing schedules, cleaning bathrooms, and general maintenance.

RVers who work part-time while traveling can have a great time enjoying their chosen lifestyle: work a few hours a week in exchange for a free camp site and other perks that may include free utilities and laundry, cable TV and Wi-Fi, and propane. Sometimes work-campers will also receive a small salary or other compensation. Other times (especially for campground manager jobs for couples) it’s a full-time job complete with salary and additional benefits and perks.

Though any job performed while living in an RV would fall under the broad definition of work-camping, there are also traditional jobs that can be done while traveling full-time on the road.

Though most work-camping positions include a free campsite, you may find that it is financially beneficial to pay for the campsite and take a more traditional position. Often you can work for a local company in the area and earn more money.

Let’s look at some options.

With the advancement in mobile technology, it has become easier to work from a mobile office.

Some RVers continue to work at the job they had before retirement. Possibilities include consultants, webmasters, graphic artists, writers, photographers, insurance claims adjusters, and sales people who work from their RV.

Establish an income producing website. You can earn income from visitors clicking on an advertisement or purchasing a product or service via a link from your website. The key is attracting enough visitors and that is the toughest part.

Travel to the geographic location that you want to explore before signing on to a job. If you accept a position just to earn money in an undesirable locale, you have really defeated the purpose of traveling full time in an RV.

It is no longer necessary to wait for retirement to live and travel full time in an RV.

Find, develop, and work your dreams and passions, then grow from there. If you need an income stream on the road, or desire to have additional spending money and something to keep you occupied, follow your dreams and your passions.

Work-campers often find part time work at national wildlife refuges and state and national parks. Pictured above are sandhill cranes at  Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (New Mexico), considered one of the most spectacular refuges in North America and consistently recognized as one of the top birding areas in the United States. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Work-campers often find part time work at national wildlife refuges and state and national parks. Pictured above are sandhill cranes at
Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (New Mexico), considered one of the most spectacular refuges in North America and consistently recognized as one of the top birding areas in the United States. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

You may not earn all you need and it may take awhile and it may take effort, but you can earn money doing what you enjoy.

The dream is not about making enough money to live and travel in an RV. It is about pursuing your passion with the full-time RV lifestyle as a means to do that.

There are unlimited ways to earn a living while traveling full time in an RV.

It takes creativity, ambition, and passion—passion for the job, passion for what the job provides you as a full-timer, or a combination of both.

Keep following your dreams!

Worth Pondering…

Life happens while you’re making plans—especially when RVing.

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