Five Must-Have Louisiana Souvenirs

Louisiana’s landscape and history create a culinary tradition unlike any place else—and that makes it the perfect RV getaway for anyone who loves to eat. But there is more to the Cajun appeal than just the food.

Tuck these five items in your RV and take a piece of Louisiana on the road with you.

1. Avery Island: Home of TABASCO

Following the tour you can also spend time in the TABASCO Country Store and check out a wide array of products and souvenirs for sale. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Following the tour you can also spend time in the TABASCO Country Store and check out a wide array of products and souvenirs for sale. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Avery Island is the home of Louisiana’s iconic hot sauce: TABASCO. See how it’s made during a factory tour then spend time in the TABASCO Country Store and check out a wide array of products and souvenirs for sale.

Seven delicious hot flavors are available at the Country Store: Original Red Sauce, Green Jalapeño Pepper Sauce, Chipotle Pepper Sauce, Buffalo Style Hot Sauce, Habanero Sauce, Garlic Pepper Sauce, and SWEET & Spicy Pepper Sauce.

2. Cajun-specific spices

Cajun food is some of the best food in America and that’s partially thanks to those amazing spices. Cajun-i-fy your food in the RV with the help of Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasoning or Slap Ya Mama Cajun Seasoning.

Tony Chachere (sa-shur-ee) was a real man, a man who loved life and knew how to cook. The folks in Acadiana referred to him as the “Ole Master” of fine Cajun cuisine. That was almost 100 years ago.

Cajun-i-fy your food in the RV with the help of Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasoning

Cajun-i-fy your food in the RV with the help of Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasoning

Today, the Tony Chachere’s Brand has grown from the simple Creole Seasoning to almost everything you’d like to pour it on or stir it in. Gumbo, Jambalaya, Etoufees, Gravies, and Rouxs; stuffed chickens, smoked sausage, and boudin, good flavor spreads fast. And it all began in a little Louisiana tow.

Tony Chachere’s Creole Seasonings include: Original Creole Seasoning, BOLD Creole Seasoning, More Spice Seasoning, Spice N’ Herb Seasoning, and Gumbo Filé.

The award winning Slap Ya Mama brand seasoning is recommended for everything from popcorn to popcorn shrimp, breakfast to late night snacks, and gourmet foods to French fries.

3. Community Coffee

Community Coffee has been a Louisiana tradition since 1919. For more than 90 years, this family-owned company has been helping Cajuns wake up. Buy a bag or two of beans for a Louisiana-flavored breakfast on the road.

A variety of flavors are available including Dark Roast, Columbia Classico, Café Special, New Orleans Blend, Coffee and Chicory, Whole Bean Louisiana Blend, Whole Bean Sumatra, and Whole Bean Brazil Santos Bourbon.

Take the genuine flavor of Louisiana with you wherever you RV. Consider joining the Community Coffee Club and receive 10 percent off every order and free shipment on all orders over $50.

4. Boudin

Cajun boudin is made from pork, liver, rice, onion, and a combination of seasonings including spicy cayenne red pepper. (Source: food.com)

Cajun boudin is made from pork, liver, rice, onion, and a combination of seasonings including spicy cayenne red pepper. (Source: food.com)

Boudin is made from the parts of the hog that can’t be preserved—liver, hog jaw, belly, heart, and kidney. All the good stuff is ground and mixed with rice, green parsley, green onions, onions, cayenne pepper, garlic powder, and other secret spices then squeezed into a sausage casing.

Don’t hesitate to pack the RV with a few dozen links for future eating pleasure. Frozen boudin travels well and will be ready to be re-heated.

You can steam it, simmer it, grill it, or throw it in the oven or microwave. Just remember you only need to heat it through; it is already cooked.

5. Cracklins

Folks in Cajun Country don’t just hang their hats on boudin, and you should eagerly sample some of the other traditional and creative regional foods they’re baking, smoking, frying, or pouring. Next to the boudin, usually under a hot lamp, are fresh cracklins, one of the most decadent snacks around—and they are delicious.

The process of making cracklins—also called cracklin, crackling, and gratins—involves two stages of frying. Because frying in pork fat once wasn’t sufficient, Cajuns decided to do it twice.

Cracklins begin as small cubes of seasoned pork skin, fat, and meat. They are first fried in a black iron pot at a lower temperature for about an hour or so and then taken out to cool. Once they are cool they are dumped back into the pot until they give a popping noise, hence the name cracklin.

Please Note: This is Part 21 of an on-going series on Louisiana Cuisine/Travel Ideas

Worth Pondering…

New Orleans…there are few who can visit her without delight; and few who can ever leave without regret.

—Lafacadio Hearn

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