Track the Weather

The skies were clear when you left home or RV Park, but a few hours later the skies over the Interstate turned dark and ominous.

AccuWeather's Road Trip Planner provides the weather forecast for your route so you can plan ahead. (Source: accuweather.com)

AccuWeather’s Road Trip Planner provides the weather forecast for your route so you can plan ahead. (Source: accuweather.com)

Suddenly, rain starts pouring down in buckets and you can hardly see. A flashing road sign instructs drivers to turn to the highway’s emergency radio station.

A severe thunderstorm warning, complete with quarter-sized hail and exceptionally high winds, is being issued for several counties in the area.

But you have no idea what county you’re in. Are you heading into the path of severe weather? Or is this cloud burst all that you’ll see?

Road Trip Planner

One way to help you plan ahead is the AccuWeather.com Road Trip Planner. Using directions by Google Maps, Road Trip Planner allows you to not only enter your start and end points to get detailed driving directions, you can also pick the time you are leaving to see hourly weather forecasts along your route.

Say you’re currently in Burlington, Vermont, and you are planning to drive your RV to Cape Cod.

You can go to the Road Trip Planner, select that you are leaving your current location at 9:30 a.m. and heading to a campground on Cape Cod. A list of directions will be generated, as well as a map that shows your route and the weather you can expect along the way.

It approximates where you should be in hourly intervals and predicts the weather and temperature for that area.

Website: accuweather.com

Earth Alerts: This disaster-watching program monitors online information related to severe, extreme, and violent weather and natural disasters in near real time, notifies you about alerts and updates, displays satellite data and imagery, and even lets you view the event in images and video.(Source: download.cnet.com)

Earth Alerts: This disaster-watching program monitors online information related to severe, extreme, and violent weather and natural disasters in near real time, notifies you about alerts and updates, displays satellite data and imagery, and even lets you view the event in images and video.(Source: download.cnet.com)

Earth Alerts

Earth Alerts is a free Windows-based application that allows you to monitor in near real-time a variety of natural hazard events that are occurring anywhere around the world. Alert notifications, reports, and imagery provide the user with a convenient way to view natural phenomenon as they occur, whether close to home or some far-flung corner of the globe.

Earth Alerts uses a variety of online resources provided by organizations such as the National Weather Service, U.S. Geological Survey, and Smithsonian Institution (just to name a few).

Earth Alerts does more than just track weather-related phenomenon. Earth Alerts monitors multiple types of natural hazard events in a single application.

It keeps an eye out for earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, hurricanes, typhoons, tornadoes, thunderstorms, floods, wildfires, and landslides.

You can select specific natural hazards or save specific locations. There’s also a mapping tool for viewing developing weather patterns. You can get all this information in near real-time alerts, too.

You can set Earth Alerts to hide in the tool bar and give you audio or visual alerts when new hazards occur. You can even have Earth Alerts send text messages to your phone or email.

You can even give it a try before you install.

Website: earthalerts.manyjourneys.com

Google Crisis Map

The Google Crisis Map gives you the most recent information on a storm's path. (Source: crisislanding.appspot.com)

The Google Crisis Map gives you the most recent information on a storm’s path. (Source: crisislanding.appspot.com)

The Google Crisis Map gives you the most recent information on a storm’s path. There’s an interactive map and a database of all the recent alerts and warnings. You’ll know when it’s time to evacuate or if it’s best to stay put.

A collection of national and regional-scale layers related to weather, hazards, and emergency preparedness and response, mostly for the US.

Website: crisislanding.appspot.com

Remember, Safety First, and Happy RVing.

Please Note: This is Part 2 of a 2-Part Series

Part 1: Prepare for Stormy Weather with Quick Exit Plan

Worth Pondering…

On the fourteenth day of April in 1935
There struck the worst of dust storms that ever filled the sky…
From Oklahoma City to the Arizona Line
Dakota and Nebraska to the lazy Rio Grande
It fell across our city like a curtain of black rolled down,
We thought it was our judgment, we thought it was our doom…
—Woody Guthrie, from his song, The Great Dust Storm

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