Are You Prepared for This Year’s Hurricane Season?

A major problem is most everyone—yes, including many RVers—thinks they can ride out a hurricane or that it’s not going to be all that severe, or more commonly, like thousands of others, wait until the last minute then find themselves stalled in a heavy traffic along with all the unprepared, last minute evacuees watching as their half-empty fuel gauge sucks out the last drops of fuel.

Evacuation is the key to safely surviving a hurricane and your RV gives you a great advantage. But, don’t wait too long. Photo: Hurricane Rita evacuation. (Source: http://media.photobucket.com/user/JenThomasson)

Evacuation is the key to safely surviving a hurricane and your RV gives you a great advantage. But, don’t wait too long. Photo: Hurricane Rita evacuation. (Source: http://media.photobucket.com/user/JenThomasson)

Hurricanes Warrant Evacuation

Evacuation is the key to safely surviving a hurricane and your RV gives you a great advantage. But, don’t wait too long. As soon as you know a hurricane is on its way, load up your RV and head inland.

Hurricanes and tropical storms often stall once they make landfall generating torrential downpours, flash floods, hail, lightening, and/or tornados. Between 1970 and 1999, 59 percent of deaths from hurricanes were caused by freshwater flooding.

Since the path of the storm may change requiring you to alter your evacuation route, stay informed as you travel. The most useful item to stay informed of current weather information is a NOAA Weather radio. Make sure you have fresh batteries in the radio and carry plenty of spares.

Snowbirds and full time RVers will already have many of the supplies needed to live for up to a week. Part time RVers should check the contents of their rigs in preparation for the hurricane season.

Lay in supplies as though you are going off to boondock somewhere for a week. Ensure that you take plenty of extra drinking water.

Hurricane Season is Upon Us– Are You Ready? (Source: ladycouturemag.com)

Hurricane Season is Upon Us– Are You Ready? (Source: ladycouturemag.com)

Keep your fuel tank and propane tank topped off because there will be long lines at gas stations when the evacuation rush is on.

Be aware that severe weather can begin many hours before the eye of the hurricane lands and winds, water surges, and storm conditions can be severe and worsen.

Even if you’re among the first to evacuate you may find full RV parks and campgrounds.

Replenish your first aid kit and check on prescription medications.

Ensure you have clothes and supplies for everyone on board including the family pet. Keep cell phones and two way radios fully charged.

Keep everyone in your family, or group, informed of plans.

By the time a hurricane is named you should be following its location and be pretty well prepared.

Hurricane Sandy was the deadliest and most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, as well as the second-costliest hurricane in United States history. (Source: uptownmagazine.com)

Hurricane Sandy was the deadliest and most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, as well as the second-costliest hurricane in United States history. (Source: uptownmagazine.com)

You don’t fool around with either hurricanes or tornadoes! Only advantage—if there is one—of hurricanes is you have far more warning and better tracking than you do with tornado.

Note: This is the Part 2 of a 4-part series on Hurricanes and the RVer

Part 1: Hurricane Primer for RVers

Part 3: Hurricane Season: A Primer

Part 4: The One-Eyed Monster: Storm Surge & Saffir-Simpson Scale

Worth Pondering…

Anyone who says they’re not afraid at the time of a hurricane is either a fool or a liar, or a little bit of both.
—Anderson Cooper

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