Livin Lite Introduces Jeep Branded Campers

Wakarusa, Indiana-based Livin Lite Recreational Vehicles announced that the company is now able to sell its official Jeep branded campers through the Livin Lite network of dealers.

Livin Lite Recreational Vehicles ExtremeTrail

“Previously, Chrysler/Jeep would only allow these campers to be sold through their official Jeep dealers, but honestly, that didn’t work out as well as any of those dealers hoped it would,” said Scott Tuttle, president of Livin Lite.

“We have been negotiating with them for over a year to get this in our dealer’s hands where dealers are much more comfortable selling campers, and where potential camper owners are much more likely to go and see one in person.”

“Last year, Jeep was the No. 1 selling SUV, and we are excited to be able to offer this unique camper through our Livin Lite dealers,” Tuttle added.

“These campers have earned the prestigious ‘Trail Rated’ badge from Jeep by passing not only the same tough 160,000-mile testing that Jeep vehicles have to go through on the famous Chelsea proving grounds, but they actually took the camper through twice to make it sure it could handle the wear and tear.”

“That means our camper went through 320,000 miles of testing. They also put it through a 24-hour saline bath test to test the durability of the metals we were using. When it came out of that test, the actual camper looked great,” he said.

“But the hitch and the safety chains, items that we add on to the camper, were rusted through.  It was amazing the detailed testing our camper went through. They actually marked every screw in the camper to make sure that it didn’t turn. In the end, we earned Detroit’s respect and their nod of approval to carry the Jeep name.”

Livin Lite Recreational Vehicles ExtremeTrail

The Jeep camper is the first trailer ever to make the cover of Four Wheeler magazine, Tuttle noted.

The manufacturer suggested retail price of the Jeep camper ranges from $9,999 to $11,999, depending on options.

Livin Lite is showing two versions of the Jeep camper at the 50th annual National RV Trade Show at the Kentucky Expo Center, Louisville, Kentucky, from November 27-29, 2012.

The National RV Trade Show is sponsored by the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA). RVIA is a trade association representing the interests of the manufacturing segment of the RV industry.

Each one will feature 17-inch Jeep rims with 32- to 35-inch off road tires.

The Trail Edition features Jeep fenders, tires, rear bumper, latches, and automotive logos—the same items used on the actual Jeep SUVs, as well as Jeep branded interior sofa/bed and tent.

The Extreme Trail Edition which is designed for extreme terrain, including rock climbing, has a steel underbelly and articulating pintel hitch that allows the camper to be towed at extreme angles.

Each Jeep camper comes with a custom paint scheme to exactly match the owner’s Jeep paint—making it a true one-of-a-kind camper for the Jeep owner, said Tuttle.

Details

Livin’ Lite Recreational Vehicles

Livin Lite Recreational Vehicles ExtremeTrail

Livin’ Lite Recreational Vehicles manufactures Quicksilver All Aluminum Ultra Light Campers, Ultralight Campers, Lightweight Campers, and Ultra-Lightweight Campers.

Because the campers are so lightweight, they can be towed by even the smallest cars. Livin’ Lite’s Quicksilver camper was named Roaming Times’ Green RV of the year in 2008 for its energy-saving lightness, long-life all-aluminum construction, and completely formaldehyde-free construction.

Address: P.O. Box 528, 1025 E. Waterford Street, Wakarusa, IN 46573

Phone: (574) 862-2228

Website: livinlite.com

Worth Pondering…

May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. May your mountains rise into and above the clouds.

—Edward Abbey

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Georgia on My Mind: Cumberland Island National Seashore

As with many parks, fire was a major concern to managers. A massive fire on the north end of the Island burned 1,700 acres in 1981.

A total of 50 miles of hiking trails meander through maritime forests, interior wetlands, historic districts, marsh ecosystems, and the beautiful beaches. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
A total of 50 miles of hiking trails meander through maritime forests, interior wetlands, historic districts, marsh ecosystems, and the beautiful beaches. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

In early January (2012) firefighters from three agencies worked with hand tools to fight a small fire burning in grasses and trees near Willow Pond at the midpoint of the 16-mile-long barrier island. After burning for more than a day, the fire covered 45 acres—or less than 1/10th of a square mile.

Most visitors come to Cumberland come for the natural glories, serenity, and fascinating history.

Its splendor will be here for future generations. The bill Nixon signed October 23, 1972, stipulates that the seashore “shall be permanently preserved in its primitive state” and no project can be undertaken that would jeopardize the island‘s “unique flora and fauna.”

Governor Sonny Perdue selected Cumberland Island National Seashore as Georgia’s site to be represented on America’s Beautiful National Park’s Quarter program. The new quarter will be minted in 2018.

The seashore is accessible by foot-only, passenger ferry from the historic community of St. Marys, Georgia, and is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year.

Did You Know?

Dungeness burned nearly to the ground in 1959 from a fire suspected as arson, but its ruins are a must-see for visitors. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
Dungeness burned nearly to the ground in 1959 from a fire suspected as arson, but its ruins are a must-see for visitors. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Cumberland Island contains four major historic districts and 87 structures listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Details

Cumberland Island National Seashore

Cumberland Island National Seashore, on the Georgia coast, includes one of the largest undeveloped barrier islands in the world. The park is also home to one of the largest maritime forests remaining in the United States, one of the largest wilderness areas in a National Seashore on the east coast, and a herd of feral, free-ranging horses.

Cumberland Island National Seashore includes a designated wilderness area, undeveloped beaches, historic sites, cultural ruins, critical wildlife habitat, and nesting areas, as well as numerous plant and animal communities. Interpretive and educational programs are available; you may hear compelling stories of the people who have shaped and been shaped by Cumberland. Most visitors come only for the day.

Getting to the Island: Accessible by ferry boat from Visitor Center dock in St. Marys. Ferry is walk-on, passenger-only. All trips are round-trip. Ferry does not transport pets, bikes, kayaks or cars. To make ferry reservation, 912-882-4335.

Reservations are required for both the ferry and camping. Visitors must check in 30 minutes before departure at the Cumberland Island Visitor Center or the reservation will be canceled.

The ferry is a walk on, passenger only ferry. All trips are round trip. No pets are allowed on the ferry.

Directions: From I-95 take Exit 3, turn east on SR 40; follow signs into St. Marys where SR 40 becomes Osborne Street which dead-ends at St. Marys Street; turn right on St. Marys Street (National Park Service Visitor Center is in a blue building; it and ferry dock are both located on left)

Visitor Center: 113 St. Marys Street, St. Marys, GA 31558

Hours: Open daily 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Ferry Fees: $20; Senior, $18; Children under 12 years, $14

Entrance Fees: $4/person (valid for 7 days) or Golden Age/Golden Access and America the Beautiful–National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass

Lands and Legacies Tour: $15; Senior and children under 12, $12.

We walked the raised boardwalk over the dunes to the wide, secluded beach, alive with crabs and shorebirds. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved
We walked the raised boardwalk over the dunes to the wide, secluded beach, alive with crabs and shorebirds. © Rex Vogel, all rights reserved

Camping: Reservations are recommended. Cumberland has one campground with showers and other facilities at Sea Camp. Wilderness and backcountry campgrounds are located at Stafford Beach, Brick Hill Bluff, Yankee Paradise and Hickory Hill.

Camping Fees: $4 per person per day at Sea Camp; $2 per person per day at other campgrounds.

Food and Drink: No concessions on island; bring your own lunch; restrooms and drinking water located at Ice House Museum, Dungeness Historic Area, Sea Camp Ranger Station, Sea Camp Campground, and Plum Orchard.

Mailing Address: 101 Wheeler Street, St. Marys, GA 31558

Phone: (912) 882-4336

Website: nps.gov/cuis

Please Note: This is part two of a 2-part series on Cumberland Island National Seashore

Part 1: Cumberland Island National Seashore Turns 40

Worth Pondering…

Georgia, Georgia, the whole day through

Just an old sweet song keeps Georgia on my mind.

Georgia, Georgia, a song of you

Comes as sweet and clear as moonlight through the pines

—Georgia On My Mind, lyrics by Stuart Gorrell, written by Hoagy Carmichael (1930), recorded by Ray Charles (1960), official state song of the State of Georgia (1979)

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